Topics

Segmented Wood Running Boards

Bob Chaparro
 

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-elywrk-frc.jpg

Is this an anomaly?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Bruce Smith
 

As I learned at Cocoa Beach, this is apparently a NYC standard application!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Feb 8, 2019, at 11:37 AM, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:
Is this an anomaly?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:
Is this an anomaly?

   Certainly not an anomaly, but far from typical.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





lrkdbn
 

I do know the NYC used these on at least several lots of box cars-both before and during WWII
Also the ART reefer line used them in the late 20's on at least some cars.
I have seen a MDT reefer drawing from 1916 in which the longitudinal running board was made up of short
boards like the lateral RB in your picture running crosswise of the car and held by a metal edge on each side.
(if you can visualize the lateral RB extended to 40 ft long)
Larry King

Paul Doggett
 

A great photo for weathering roofs.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 8 Feb 2019, at 18:39, lrkdbn via Groups.Io <lrkdbn@...> wrote:

I do know the NYC used these on at least several lots of box cars-both before and during WWII
Also the ART reefer line used them in the late 20's on at least some cars.
I have seen a MDT reefer drawing from 1916 in which the longitudinal running board was made up of short
boards like the lateral RB in your picture running crosswise of the car and held by a metal edge on each side.
(if you can visualize the lateral RB extended to 40 ft long)
Larry King

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Did the NYC use these segmented running boards on their USRA steel boxcars?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Paul Doggett via Groups.Io" <paul.doggett2472@...>
Date: 2/8/19 9:04 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Segmented Wood Running Boards

A great photo for weathering roofs.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 8 Feb 2019, at 18:39, lrkdbn via Groups.Io <lrkdbn@...> wrote:

I do know the NYC used these on at least several lots of box cars-both before and during WWII
Also the ART reefer line used them in the late 20's on at least some cars.
I have seen a MDT reefer drawing from 1916 in which the longitudinal running board was made up of short
boards like the lateral RB in your picture running crosswise of the car and held by a metal edge on each side.
(if you can visualize the lateral RB extended to 40 ft long)
Larry King

Daniel McConnachie
 

Canadian National did this as well on quite a few of their 40' steel boxcars. 

Cheers, Daniel.

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 12:37 PM Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-elywrk-frc.jpg

Is this an anomaly?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Daniel McConnachie

Jack Mullen
 

Not quite the same thing, but in the '20s and '30s, Milwaukee seems to have placed the board joints opposite each other rather than the normal staggered pattern.  The individual boards were longer than the NYC examples, so the running boards divided into 3 or 4 segments.

Jack Mullen

Tony Thompson
 

This sounds like the conventional three-board arrangement.
Tony Thompson 


On Feb 8, 2019, at 3:27 PM, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

Not quite the same thing, but in the '20s and '30s, Milwaukee seems to have placed the board joints opposite each other rather than the normal staggered pattern.  The individual boards were longer than the NYC examples, so the running boards divided into 3 or 4 segments.

Jack Mullen