Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads


Andy Laurent
 

STMFC-ers,

I have been searching for a source of HO scale sheet piling pieces, and having found one in Germany that produces a fantastic product, I am ready to create some mill gon loads for my 1952-era layout.  One question: How was sheet piling loaded in the transition era?  I am planning on 50' lengths of piling in 53' mill gons, and the width of my material allows for two rows/piles/bundles in the car.  Having looked at the AAR Open Top Loading Rules book from 1949, I see a few entries for structural steel shapes in gondolas (including Items 53 and 56-a). But having seen many steel shapes loaded loose in gons, I'm wondering what such loads really looked like in practice.

Does anyone have images of sheet piling loads in gondolas?

Thank you,
Andy L.
Madison, WI


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Andy,
 
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Andy Laurent via groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads
 
STMFC-ers,

I have been searching for a source of HO scale sheet piling pieces, and having found one in Germany that produces a fantastic product, I am ready to create some mill gon loads for my 1952-era layout.  One question: How was sheet piling loaded in the transition era?  I am planning on 50' lengths of piling in 53' mill gons, and the width of my material allows for two rows/piles/bundles in the car.  Having looked at the AAR Open Top Loading Rules book from 1949, I see a few entries for structural steel shapes in gondolas (including Items 53 and 56-a). But having seen many steel shapes loaded loose in gons, I'm wondering what such loads really looked like in practice.

Does anyone have images of sheet piling loads in gondolas?

Thank you,
Andy L.
Madison, WI


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 12:31 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
This website says it was developed in 1906: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larssen_sheet_piling

Common usage was likely after WWII , when the cost of labor made wood cribbed retaining walls more expensive that the cost of steel.

Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 11:43 AM, Andy Laurent wrote:
Does anyone have images of sheet piling loads in gondolas?
Since the vast majority of intenet images are modern era, and most sheet piling comes from China and India these days, the only images I'm finding are in ISO containers:



I'm sure loading in a gon was similar. Note the open face can be either up or down, but I suspect down was more common before the days of giant fork lifts. The traditional method of handling with a crane used a hook on each end connected to a ring on the crane hook. and open side down means the hook can be placed on ALL the lengths, including the bottom most, and more importantly, the center of gravity will be below the hook.

Dennis Storzek


Ralph W. Brown
 

Thanks, Dennis.
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Dennis Storzek
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2021 4:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads
 
On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 12:31 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
This website says it was developed in 1906: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larssen_sheet_piling

Common usage was likely after WWII , when the cost of labor made wood cribbed retaining walls more expensive that the cost of steel.

Dennis Storzek


Brian Carlson
 

Probably more history than you want.  

On Nov 22, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 12:31 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
This website says it was developed in 1906: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larssen_sheet_piling

Common usage was likely after WWII , when the cost of labor made wood cribbed retaining walls more expensive that the cost of steel.

Dennis Storzek

--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Andy Laurent
 

Thank you for digging up those images, Dennis.  I will assume they were banded into bundles and placed U-down, loosely in the car...unless I see differently.

Andy L.
Madison WI


Guy Wilber
 

Andy wrote:

“I have been searching for a source of HO scale sheet piling pieces, and having found one in Germany that produces a fantastic product, I am ready to create some mill gon loads for my 1952-era layout. One question: How was sheet piling loaded in the transition era? I am planning on 50' lengths of piling in 53' mill gons, and the width of my material allows for two rows/piles/bundles in the car. Having looked at the AAR Open Top Loading Rules book from 1949, I see a few entries for structural steel shapes in gondolas (including Items 53 and 56-a). But having seen many steel shapes loaded loose in gons, I'm wondering what such loads really looked like in practice?”

Andy,

The AAR never published a rule specifically tailored to the shipment of sheet piling within the scope of The STMFC. In fact, there is still not one within the present day Open Top Rules.

The Figures that you mentioned are good choices for securing sheet piling along with 52-A.

The 1949 Rules Book you cite is the second supplement to the 1947 Rules and contains only figures which were revised, or newly added, as of June, 1949. All figures within Supplement 2, as well as those within the 1947 Rules, covering steel products (excluding pipe) would later be incorporated into the first of the AAR’s individual pamphlets (MD-1) effective September 1, 1950. All the figures were renumbered including those which were new and revised. If you need copies I can scan and forward to you. Figure 52-A (revised) became Figure 39, Figure 53 (revised - showing specific General Rules for reference) became Figure 40 and Figure 56-A (revised) became Figure 42.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Nov 27, 2021, at 11:41, Guy Wilber via groups.io <guycwilber=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

[...]

If you need copies I can scan and forward to you.
If there are no incumbrances, please consider posting the material in the files section.
--
Willie saw some dynamite
Couldn't understand it quite
Curiosity never pays;
It rained Willie seven days.