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Shipping sugar cane by rail...

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Shipping sugar cane by rail...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

Tim O'Connor
 

Claus

Could this be BAGASSE rather than fresh sugar cane? I have usually heard this type of freight car
called a bagasse car.

Tim O"Connor



On 7/6/2020 6:51 PM, Claus Schlund wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Shipping sugar cane by rail...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

erieblt2
 

Growing up in Hawaii I know that from the moment the cane is cut it’s on a very tight schedule to get to the crushers quickly(quality issue). I’m guessing the train is only hauling cane, and racing to the mill. Big cars! How unloaded? 


On Jul 6, 2020, at 6:07 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Claus

Could this be BAGASSE rather than fresh sugar cane? I have usually heard this type of freight car
called a bagasse car.

Tim O"Connor



On 7/6/2020 6:51 PM, Claus Schlund wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Shipping sugar cane by rail...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

csxt5555
 

Those are sugar cane cars.   Bagasse isn’t hauled but used as fuel in the boilers.  Yes it is on a very tight schedule from the time it is burned till grinding is 8 hrs.  We dump the cars on their side to unload them.  That’s the way it’s been done for years and years.  The oldest car I’ve seen in service this last season was 1926.  I’m sure it’s possible that some of those cars pictured have been rebuilt and are still in service. 

-Kevin




On Jul 6, 2020, at 9:13 PM, erieblt2 <williamfsmith22@...> wrote:

Growing up in Hawaii I know that from the moment the cane is cut it’s on a very tight schedule to get to the crushers quickly(quality issue). I’m guessing the train is only hauling cane, and racing to the mill. Big cars! How unloaded? 


On Jul 6, 2020, at 6:07 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Claus

Could this be BAGASSE rather than fresh sugar cane? I have usually heard this type of freight car
called a bagasse car.

Tim O"Connor



On 7/6/2020 6:51 PM, Claus Schlund wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Shipping sugar cane by rail...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

George Eichelberger
 

The sides are hinged at the top, the unloading track tips, the cane falls out.

There are still many miles of sugar cane trackage around Lake Okeechobee. A short line operates on the ex-FEC branch to South Bay, the ex-ACL line down from Sebring and the US Sugar Co trackage at Bryant. The South Central Florida Railroad's modern shop is rebuilding one of the USSC, ex FEC 4-6-2 for operation. There are trains running constantly during the harvest.

Ike

akerboomk
 

RE: How unloaded?

 

Having just read thru the Magor Car Corp book by Ed Kaminski [so now I must be an expert, never having seen a sugar cane car before)  ;-)] – looks like side dump to me?

 

Ken

 


--
Ken Akerboom

Randy Hees
 

There were a number of sugar cane car designs... some dump, some unload via a crane and grapple.  Many were narrow gauge. They were built by a number of builders... including Magor, Brill, and lots of over seas providers like Ducaville.  Car designs used seem to follow regional lines... so the cars in Florida are likely all similar while those in Cuba or Hawaii or Australia will look different.

Randy Hees

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Several list members asked about unloading the sugar cane cars. I don't have that answer, but this is how they were loaded!
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
To: STMFC
Sent: Monday, July 06, 2020 6:51 PM
Subject: Shipping sugar cane by rail...

Hi List Members,
 
Shipping sugar cane by rail...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund