Topics

Side dump cars


John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

Bob Schliecher had an article maybe a decade ago on the side dump cars, and said that while intended mainly for ballast, on occasion they were used for coal. I think that while sometimes they were used for on-line coal service, I would be interested in any proof or hint that these cars went off-line. - John


Richard Hendrickson
 

John Nehrich wrote:

Bob Schliecher had an article maybe a decade ago on the side dump cars,
and said that while intended mainly for ballast, on occasion they were
used for coal. I think that while sometimes they were used for on-line
coal service, I would be interested in any proof or hint that these cars
went off-line.
I've never seen any photographic evidence that Hart Selective ballast
hoppers or the similar cars with dump mechanisms by Enterprise and other
mfrs. (which I assume are the cars you're talking about) ever went off
line, regardless of who owned them. So I'm as skeptical as you are.
There's evidence that some RRs (e.g., the UP) sometimes hauled coal in
them, but with the cars being costly to build and maintain and intended
primarily for ballast service, I can't imagine any RR willingly allowing
them to go off line in interchange.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote...it seems about a year ago:

I've never seen any photographic evidence that Hart Selective ballast
hoppers or the similar cars with dump mechanisms by Enterprise and other
mfrs. (which I assume are the cars you're talking about) ever went off
line, regardless of who owned them. So I'm as skeptical as you are.
There's evidence that some RRs (e.g., the UP) sometimes hauled coal in
them,
Actually, from the photographic evidence that's available...and there's a
bunch...UP used these cars quite often to haul coal. Seldom will you see UP
hoppers carrying coal to a coaling tower without side dumping cars in the
group. In fact, in one of Terry Metcalfe's UP Modelers...I think...he
mentioned that, of the 5 or so hoppers present in a photograph, there were
five different variations of hoppers...several being side dumping. In
addition, UP used them to haul sugar beets. This occurred along the Front
Range north of Denver. I'm not really certain about where the beets were
processed...I know damned well it was not on Sherman Hill...so I can't say
for sure where they traveled. Knowing UP during the '40/'50 time period, it
would not surprise me at anything they put in one of these cars...including
cattle. No, no...I have no proof.

Mike Brock


Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Brock [mailto:brockm@...]
In addition, UP used them to haul sugar beets. This occurred along the
Front
Range north of Denver. I'm not really certain about where the beets were
processed...I know damned well it was not on Sherman Hill...so I can't say
for sure where they traveled.
For the UP, sugar mills covered the front range north on Denver -- places
like Loveland fer instance. Sugar was also made north and south of Salt Lake
City, and I think a few places in Idaho as well. By and large, beet
movements were very short outside of California, 50-100 miles in 1950.
Close in farms used trucks, so the rail served market was a doughnut.

Beet campaigns in the rocky mountain states usually ran in October thru
November, tho if the weather was mild it might extend into December.
California is unusual in that it also has a May campaign. This translates
into a whole lot of tonnage in a very brief time.

The business of sugar had the mills selling seed under contract so it was
not a seemingly random car movement from farm to highest price location but
more like a unit train.

Excellent coverage of the Colorago beets business in a past CB&Q historical
society issue (number escapes me at the momment).

Dave Nelson


Al & Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

We will be at Timonium next week. Anyone wanting us to bring specific kits,
let us know. - Al Westerfield
Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Brock <brockm@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2001 1:52 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Side dump cars


Richard Hendrickson wrote...it seems about a year ago:

I've never seen any photographic evidence that Hart Selective ballast
hoppers or the similar cars with dump mechanisms by Enterprise and other
mfrs. (which I assume are the cars you're talking about) ever went off
line, regardless of who owned them. So I'm as skeptical as you are.
There's evidence that some RRs (e.g., the UP) sometimes hauled coal in
them,
Actually, from the photographic evidence that's available...and there's a
bunch...UP used these cars quite often to haul coal. Seldom will you see
UP
hoppers carrying coal to a coaling tower without side dumping cars in the
group. In fact, in one of Terry Metcalfe's UP Modelers...I think...he
mentioned that, of the 5 or so hoppers present in a photograph, there were
five different variations of hoppers...several being side dumping. In
addition, UP used them to haul sugar beets. This occurred along the Front
Range north of Denver. I'm not really certain about where the beets were
processed...I know damned well it was not on Sherman Hill...so I can't say
for sure where they traveled. Knowing UP during the '40/'50 time period,
it
would not surprise me at anything they put in one of these
cars...including
cattle. No, no...I have no proof.

Mike Brock


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Richard Hendrickson
 

Mike Brock wrote (about Hart Selective ballast hoppers):

....it
would not surprise me at anything they put in one of these cars...including
cattle.
The question is, did they load cattle in *N&W* hopper cars?

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

The question is, did they load cattle in *N&W* hopper cars?<
I believe after processing they did, i.e., bones <VBG>! I'm sure I saw
a load of those going over Sherman, and at night too!

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax DCC owner, Chief system
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

A noted N&W hopper historian asks:

The question is, did they load cattle in *N&W* hopper cars?
I'm sure that I will forever learn to regret that fateful day back a few yrs
ago when I speculated that perhaps we should have a plastic N&W hopper. Many
visitors, looking at the layout for the first time...my carefully arranged
Big Boys and Challengers panting from concealed speakers, gleaming frshly
painted veranda turbine sitting on the departure track awaiting the arriving
4-12-2 chuffing its well known off beat exhaust, etc...turn to me and
remark, "Where's the N&W hopper"?

Mike Brock


thompson@...
 

Mike Brock writes:
I'm sure that I will forever learn to regret that fateful day back a few yrs
ago when I speculated that perhaps we should have a plastic N&W hopper. Many
visitors, looking at the layout for the first time...my carefully arranged
Big Boys and Challengers panting from concealed speakers, gleaming frshly
painted veranda turbine sitting on the departure track awaiting the arriving
4-12-2 chuffing its well known off beat exhaust, etc...turn to me and
remark, "Where's the N&W hopper"?
Well, Mike, y'see, there's all kinds of payback for sins. Now take the
case of Tim O'Connor...

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history