Topics

Slide and Negative Scanners


Charlie Vlk
 

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Nathan Obermeyer
 

Charlie,

I have an Epson V600 and have been pretty happy with it for slides, negatives, and old photos. I've been pretty impressed with the negative digital scans compared to photos that were produced from the negatives. I wish I would have went with a V800 or V850 to scan more slides at a time then the 4 I can now. But I don't have a large slide collection and only purchase a few slides at a time so it's not an issue. Another option for slides is an adaptor for a SLR camera which allows for faster images and the ability to focus better. The camera option is pretty cheap - given if you already have a SLR plus they'll download directly to lightroom/photoshop for processing. 

Nate


Bill McClure
 

Charlie,

I have done a lot of scanning over the years, starting with a Nikon Coolscan. At the moment I have an Epson V750 Pro flatbed that will do everything from negs to slides to documents, and a Plustek Optic Film 7600i that does slides and negs. I much prefer the latter for slides and 35mm negs. Both of these have a few years on them so there might be newer models. They came from B&H Photo in New York.

The Epson flatbed versions would handle your aperture cards well. I have scanned old, odd sized prints and B&W negs on that one with great results.

But for me the key is scanning software. I use Silverfast Ai, a German product that has a special setting for Kodachrome and works extremely well. Kodachrome was made with dye layers that can befuddle some scanners. That software is specific for the scanner model.

Good luck,
Bill


Chuck Soule
 

Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive uses Epson scanners, primarily the V800 and V850.  I particularly like that the the associated computer software lets you tweak the scan parameters based on your preview, before you do the final scan.  So minimal photoshopping afterwards!  I have only done prints on it, not slides or negatives, but I know it has the capability.  I believe the V850 slide template will hold 12 slides at once.  It's not cheap, but it is a very good scanner.

Chuck Soule


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Charlie,

I use an "Epson Perfection V8000 Photo" scanner, a semi-pro machine that does a pretty good job scanning slides and negatives, as well as general copying. The software is a bit clunky, but I'm used to it now. Everything gets washed through Photoshop anyway. I paid somewhere between $400-500 for the Epson. If you've looked at photos I've shared here, you are seeing stuff done on that machine. This model has probably been succeeded by a newer version with a higher number, but the Epson machines in this range are pretty good, and good values too.

My scanner came with several frames, one for 35 mm negatives, one for 35 mm slides, and some others for which I have yet to find a use. When I have an odd-sized negative, I put it right on the glass. A 6" plastic ruler along the bottom edge keeps the negative square and moves it away from a void space along the edge of the glass. After I have a preview shot on my screen, I select the area of the negative I actually want, eliminating the ruler.

One more thing to consider. Besides Photoshop I use the powerful but inexpensive Graphic Convertor program from Lemke Software. It does some stuff that is really hard to do with Photoshop, like adding text to an image. As its name implies, it can also convert from or to a number of formats, many more than Photoshop can handle. I save everything in TIFF (which unlike JPEG is stable), except for what I convert back to JPEG for attaching to emails.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 1:53 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Jerry Michels
 

Charlie, Very much of interest to me.  Jerry Michels


Jack Burgess
 

Like others I too have a Epson scanner…a V600. It scans up to 1200 dpi so it can scan negs and has a holder for slides.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charlie Vlk
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 10:53 AM
To: CBQ@groups.io; Ry-ops-industrialSIG@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Slide and Negative Scanners

 

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Clark Propst
 

I bought a Magnasonic unit off Amazon. It’s a little thing, doesn’t take up much space. There’s a learning curve to editing, especially color. Other than that it’s ok.

Clark Propst

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


John Barry
 

Charlie,

I have the Epson V800 and have had good success with prints, negatives, slides, documents and maps.  With the slide frame I was able to quickly scan a loaned collection of about 50 slides in a couple evenings.  The 1944 Santa Fe map of the United States is a combination of five scans stitched together.  I wrote a post about it back in July.  The Fe-U and the 1944 Railroad Map.  I also scanned the Fe-U print in that post on my V800 and straightened it with Photoshop Elements.  You can download a jpg of the map through a link in that blog post.  It also works well scanning documents for later conversion to PDF.  I usually scan to TIFF, then convert as that gives me greater flexibility for character recognition of multiple column pages.  I'm very happy with the V800 as an all around photo scanner.

John

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 






On Thursday, November 19, 2020, 03:20:29 PM EST, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Charlie,

I use an "Epson Perfection V8000 Photo" scanner, a semi-pro machine that does a pretty good job scanning slides and negatives, as well as general copying. The software is a bit clunky, but I'm used to it now. Everything gets washed through Photoshop anyway. I paid somewhere between $400-500 for the Epson. If you've looked at photos I've shared here, you are seeing stuff done on that machine. This model has probably been succeeded by a newer version with a higher number, but the Epson machines in this range are pretty good, and good values too.

My scanner came with several frames, one for 35 mm negatives, one for 35 mm slides, and some others for which I have yet to find a use. When I have an odd-sized negative, I put it right on the glass. A 6" plastic ruler along the bottom edge keeps the negative square and moves it away from a void space along the edge of the glass. After I have a preview shot on my screen, I select the area of the negative I actually want, eliminating the ruler.

One more thing to consider. Besides Photoshop I use the powerful but inexpensive Graphic Convertor program from Lemke Software. It does some stuff that is really hard to do with Photoshop, like adding text to an image. As its name implies, it can also convert from or to a number of formats, many more than Photoshop can handle. I save everything in TIFF (which unlike JPEG is stable), except for what I convert back to JPEG for attaching to emails.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 1:53 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Douglas Harding
 

I have an Epson Perfection 3170 Photo flatbed scanner with USB cable. I've had it for years. Windows 10 does not recognize it on plug and play, but I downloaded the drivers from Epson's website, installed them, and it works fine. It does a great job. I can scan four slides at once. Up to 12000dpi. This model was discontinued years and years ago. But they still show up on ebay. One caution, I did have to make one repair. The plastic support holding the pulley for the cable broke. But a hole and 2-56 took care of that pretty quick after I found a how too on YouTube. Any modeler should be able to do that in 5 minutes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Barry
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 9:17 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Slide and Negative Scanners

 

Charlie,

 

I have the Epson V800 and have had good success with prints, negatives, slides, documents and maps.  With the slide frame I was able to quickly scan a loaned collection of about 50 slides in a couple evenings.  The 1944 Santa Fe map of the United States is a combination of five scans stitched together.  I wrote a post about it back in July.  The Fe-U and the 1944 Railroad Map.  I also scanned the Fe-U print in that post on my V800 and straightened it with Photoshop Elements.  You can download a jpg of the map through a link in that blog post.  It also works well scanning documents for later conversion to PDF.  I usually scan to TIFF, then convert as that gives me greater flexibility for character recognition of multiple column pages.  I'm very happy with the V800 as an all around photo scanner.

 

John

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

 

 

707-490-9696 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Thursday, November 19, 2020, 03:20:29 PM EST, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:

 

 

Charlie,

 

I use an "Epson Perfection V8000 Photo" scanner, a semi-pro machine that does a pretty good job scanning slides and negatives, as well as general copying. The software is a bit clunky, but I'm used to it now. Everything gets washed through Photoshop anyway. I paid somewhere between $400-500 for the Epson. If you've looked at photos I've shared here, you are seeing stuff done on that machine. This model has probably been succeeded by a newer version with a higher number, but the Epson machines in this range are pretty good, and good values too.

 

My scanner came with several frames, one for 35 mm negatives, one for 35 mm slides, and some others for which I have yet to find a use. When I have an odd-sized negative, I put it right on the glass. A 6" plastic ruler along the bottom edge keeps the negative square and moves it away from a void space along the edge of the glass. After I have a preview shot on my screen, I select the area of the negative I actually want, eliminating the ruler.

 

One more thing to consider. Besides Photoshop I use the powerful but inexpensive Graphic Convertor program from Lemke Software. It does some stuff that is really hard to do with Photoshop, like adding text to an image. As its name implies, it can also convert from or to a number of formats, many more than Photoshop can handle. I save everything in TIFF (which unlike JPEG is stable), except for what I convert back to JPEG for attaching to emails.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 1:53 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


prr6380
 

I have had good experience with Pacific Imaging Powerslide 5000.  It scans up to 5000 dpi and 4800 bit conversion.  The best feature for scanning large numbers of slides using magazines like a slide projectors.  I load them up, start it up and leave it alone.  Scanning at high resolutions is time consuming.  I can't look forward using a scanner doing only 4 or so at a time when faced with hundred or thousands to be done.  I've done only 1500 or 2000 my self so far as I can't get excited doing more.  It is hooked up directly to a USB port on a computer.
Walt Stafa


radiodial868
 

I'll be the Epson contrarian and report I use an HP Scanjet G4050. It has the full set of apertures and you can make your own for odd sized negatives.  The more important part to me is the software. I use VueScan from Hamrick Software (https://www.hamrick.com/)
You can pick up a used G4050 very reasonably. If anyone ever needs a replacement set of apertures, let me know. I have an extra set.
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


devansprr
 

Charlie,

This is an interesting alternative, although it only works for 35mm slides. It came up on the RR Historical Society SIG group. Credit to Jeff Eggert over at CNWHS:

http://www.yardoffice.com/archives/howto/slideshootingdslr.html

In addition to being pretty fast, if you already have a slide projector and DLSR, it is of nominal cost.

At some point I need to use this setup for my non-RR family slide collection. I used a Canon film scanner in the past, and liked it very much, but it has suffered a hardware failure after about 15 years and I have not yet attempted a repair (nor do I know if parts are available.)

But my Canon scanner could never scan close to the 300 slides per hour rate that Jeff claims.

Dave Evans


Mont Switzer
 

OK guys, at the risk of sounding like the hack that I am, I developed a method years ago of digitizing slides in a hurry.  The resulting photo is usually needed for a model in process.

 

I have a device that is like a small light table that I used to use when sorting color slides.  It still comes in handy for this.  I also learned that I could set up a designated spot on the light table and aim my camera with close up lens at it.  Then all I had to do was scoot the slide(s) into that spot, focus on the subject in the slide and take a digital image.  Pretty quick.

 

This is not a museum quality operation, but when you consider that my hobby is building models, it serves my purposes pretty well.

 

Yes, I have a 3600 dpi slide scanner for the more critical digital conversions, but I don't let it slow my model building down.   

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of devansprr [devans1@...]
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2020 1:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Slide and Negative Scanners

Charlie,

This is an interesting alternative, although it only works for 35mm slides. It came up on the RR Historical Society SIG group. Credit to Jeff Eggert over at CNWHS:

http://www.yardoffice.com/archives/howto/slideshootingdslr.html

In addition to being pretty fast, if you already have a slide projector and DLSR, it is of nominal cost.

At some point I need to use this setup for my non-RR family slide collection. I used a Canon film scanner in the past, and liked it very much, but it has suffered a hardware failure after about 15 years and I have not yet attempted a repair (nor do I know if parts are available.)

But my Canon scanner could never scan close to the 300 slides per hour rate that Jeff claims.

Dave Evans


Charlie Vlk
 

All-

 

Thanks to everybody who responded with their recommendations and experiences regarding slide and negative scanners!

Thanks also to the moderators for letting the discussion run online for the edification of all as well.  I am going to put all the responses into a folder as there is a lot of good information for future reference.

To close the threads here is what I decided to do:

The Epson flatbed scanners seem to get decent marks for a number of you.   I decided to order the Epson V600 as it will appears to meet my speed, resolution and ease of use parameters.   If I should need something better I can always get a higher grade machine but for now I can at least start to get the slides and negatives out of boxes and see what I have.  In addition to doing 35mm slides and various film negative formats the V600 will also handle the aperture cards if I need to scan one or decide to start working through the 1000 cards.

I have had good experience with Epson printers and that was a factor in my decision as well.

A bonus was that with my Best Buy credit card points I was able to get it shipped to me free for less than half the retail out of pocket!

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Steve SANDIFER
 

This looks great, but I don’t have a Canon 100 mm macro that will go 1:1.  That will set me back over $1000.  But it is interesting.

Back in my film days I did use a film camera on a bellows with an El Nikkor enlarging lens and a slide carrier to duplicate slides. A pin registered mount allowed double, triple, etc. exposure for titles, etc.  Those days are (happily) gone.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of devansprr
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2020 12:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Slide and Negative Scanners

 

Charlie,

This is an interesting alternative, although it only works for 35mm slides. It came up on the RR Historical Society SIG group. Credit to Jeff Eggert over at CNWHS:

http://www.yardoffice.com/archives/howto/slideshootingdslr.html

In addition to being pretty fast, if you already have a slide projector and DLSR, it is of nominal cost.

At some point I need to use this setup for my non-RR family slide collection. I used a Canon film scanner in the past, and liked it very much, but it has suffered a hardware failure after about 15 years and I have not yet attempted a repair (nor do I know if parts are available.)

But my Canon scanner could never scan close to the 300 slides per hour rate that Jeff claims.

Dave Evans