Topics

Southeastern meat packing plants


C J Wyatt
 

<<I found five meat packing plants in the south in 1938:
Armour & Company, Tifton [I think] Georgia, packed Pork. They were on
the Southern, I think.
Cudahy Packing in Albany, Georgia, with an annual capacity of 50,000
cattle, 350,000 hogs, 35,000 sheep & lambs. Looks like they were on
the ACL.
E.M.Todd & Co., Smithfield, Virginia, Internationally known Smithfield
Virginia Hams. N&W?
Swift & Company, Iowa, Louisiana (A town near Lake Charles) Beef Plant
was served by the Southern Pacific.
Swift & Company, Moultrie, Georgia - billed itself as the largest
capacity of all such plants in the SE. Also ACL?

There may have been more from Indiana, Cincinnati, or Missouri.

Corrections or confirmations cordially accepted.>>

Tom, what sources did you use to come up with this good stuff?

I'm thinking that Atlanta had a large Swift & Company plant. Do you know anything about it?

All this ties in with a stock car challenge I posted a few weeks ago. A photo I posted in the files area had 4 stock cars to id. Link to picture is:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/stockcars.JPG

With some help from Richard Hendrickson, the cars were identified as all being from Western roads - MKT, T&P and two ATSF's. Train is headed to Atlanta from Birmingham. I'm excited by having the possibility of some western stock cars in my Southeastern setting.

Jack


ibs4421@...
 

Jack,
I am in correspondence with a gentleman who was the station agent for the L&N at Paris, TN in the late 40's. He remembers stock cars from many roads loading on the Memphis Line there, among them MoPac stock cars.

Warren
Heading to Chattanooga next week and hitting some cool sites along the way.
Ride The Battlefield Route!
Ride the Dixie Line!
NC&StL Rwy.
Tom, what sources did you use to come up with this good stuff?

I'm thinking that Atlanta had a large Swift & Company plant. Do you know anything about it?

All this ties in with a stock car challenge I posted a few weeks ago. A photo I posted in the files area had 4 stock cars to id. Link to picture is:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/stockcars.JPG

With some help from Richard Hendrickson, the cars were identified as all being from Western roads - MKT, T&P and two ATSF's. Train is headed to Atlanta from Birmingham. I'm excited by having the possibility of some western stock cars in my Southeastern setting.

Jack






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Tom Gloger
 

I wrote
<<I found five meat packing plants in the south in 1938:
Armour & Company, Tifton [I think] Georgia, packed Pork. They
were on the Southern, I think.
Cudahy Packing in Albany, Georgia, with an annual capacity of
50,000 cattle, 350,000 hogs, 35,000 sheep & lambs. Looks like
they were on the ACL.
E.M.Todd & Co., Smithfield, Virginia, Internationally known
Smithfield Virginia Hams. N&W?
Swift & Company, Iowa, Louisiana (A town near Lake Charles)
Beef Plant was served by the Southern Pacific.
Swift & Company, Moultrie, Georgia - billed itself as the
largest capacity of all such plants in the SE. Also ACL?

There may have been more from Indiana, Cincinnati, or Missouri.

Corrections or confirmations cordially accepted.>>
--- Jack Wyatt <cjwyatt@bellsouth.net> wrote:
Tom, what sources did you use to come up with this good stuff?
It's from my book, Tom's 1938 Register. Check out the web page
http://pws.prserv.net/usinet.tgloger/t38r.htm

Most of what I wrote above was found in the WPA guide books written
in the late 1930s to very early 1940s. They're travel guides, but
I think anyone modeling in that period would do well to locate a
copy for the area being modeled, and read it cover to cover.
They're real time-periscopes, with one for every state, plus Alaska,
several scattered cities, and one that followed U.S. Hwy 1 down the
coast! I've extracted as much industrial information as I could
find from them, and supplemented it from other sources.

I'm thinking that Atlanta had a large Swift & Company plant. Do you
know anything about it?
Probably, but alas, for Atlanta, the WPA had virtually nothing to say
about industry, concentrating on instead on commerce, history, etc.
I had to go to other sources for that.


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dixierails <dixierails@...>
 

Jack,
Several years ago when I was living in Atlanta, I was told Armour Drive in
Atlanta was so named because Armour had a large packing plant in the area.
The site was west of I-85N and on the south bank of the Chattahoochee River.
I'm not certain when it was closed, but I may get a chance in a couple of
weeks to search through records in Atlanta to zero in on the era the plant
operated.

I seem to remember the Sanborn Insurance maps showed a Swift and Armour
plant in that area, but won't swear to it at this time. I do know that in
the mid-50's and early 60s a great deal of the Southern meat trade was
filled by local packing plants processing local cattle and hogs. To meet the
needs of larger cities / towns, it's more than likely that some processed
meat was transported into the South. However, on a per capita bases, I doubt
the amount of meat imported into the South from the midwest was as great as
the per capita meat imports into the industral northeast. This appears to be
an interesting thread you've pulled.

One thing that shouldn't be overlooked is the amount of meat traffic from
Florida out to the other 47 states prior to the end of WWII. At one time,
Florida was a leading cattle producing state, ranking #1 or #2 in the
country. However, there was little in the way of processing facilities in
the state. Instead most of the cattle must have been shipped out live for
processing elsewhere since there are few records of cattle drives after the
Civil War.
Larry Sexton

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jack Wyatt" <cjwyatt@bellsouth.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2001 2:09 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Southeastern meat packing plants



Swift & Company, Moultrie, Georgia - billed itself as the largest
capacity of all such plants in the SE.
I'm thinking that Atlanta had a large Swift & Company plant. Do you know
anything about it?


C J Wyatt
 

<<I seem to remember the Sanborn Insurance maps showed a Swift and Armour
plant in that area, but won't swear to it at this time. I do know that in
the mid-50's and early 60s a great deal of the Southern meat trade was
filled by local packing plants processing local cattle and hogs. To meet the
needs of larger cities / towns, it's more than likely that some processed
meat was transported into the South. However, on a per capita bases, I doubt
the amount of meat imported into the South from the midwest was as great as
the per capita meat imports into the industral northeast. This appears to be
an interesting thread you've pulled...

Larry Sexton >>

Thanks Larry,

The Swift & Company plant in Atlanta was next to the Southern's Inman Yard
and presumably also next to NC&StL's Hills Park Yard. It can be seen in the
background on pp. 56-57 of Southern Railway in Color <Volume I>. I wasn't
aware of the location of the location of the Armour plant, but Southern had
an Armour Yd. where the Decatur Belt line branched off of the DC-Atlanta
Main. I basically agree with your assessment of the Southeastern meat trade
back during the late steam era, though I don't have any supporting facts.

There was also a Howells Stock Yard adjacent to the Howells Interlocking
wye. I wonder if it functioned as a livestock auction, with the animals
being trucked to the slaughter houses of the winning bidders.

I think we have a lot more to learn on the topic, but I'm happy about the
diversity of traffic that all of this represents.

Jack