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Southern Pacific GS Gondola Question

Bill Welch
 

I have pretty much completed building a model of one of the SP's G50-15 GS gons using the Detail Associates kit. The G50-15 was the initial group built with the flat plate ends with two rib stiffeners. The quality of styrene used for these kits seems to vary and mine has developed cracks on both sides. I am thinking of making "patch panels" with 0.005 sheet styrene as if the broken panels have been damaged in some fashion and thus repaired. A panel like this would strengthen the side and mask the break.

I am curious if anyone has photos of any SP G series steel sided gons with repaired panels. I am trying to understand if the Southern Pacific repaired panels rather than replacing them and if they did, were the patches welded  or riveted?

Thank you,
Bill Welch

Paul Doggett
 

Bill

The SP gons didn’t have the same problems as they were made of steel not plastic 😁😁😁 the DA kits are noted for there brittle plastic I have built several some of them have been really brittle.
Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 25 May 2020, at 18:17, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have pretty much completed building a model of one of the SP's G50-15 GS gons using the Detail Associates kit. The G50-15 was the initial group built with the flat plate ends with two rib stiffeners. The quality of styrene used for these kits seems to vary and mine has developed cracks on both sides. I am thinking of making "patch panels" with 0.005 sheet styrene as if the broken panels have been damaged in some fashion and thus repaired. A panel like this would strengthen the side and mask the break.

I am curious if anyone has photos of any SP G series steel sided gons with repaired panels. I am trying to understand if the Southern Pacific repaired panels rather than replacing them and if they did, were the patches welded  or riveted?

Thank you,
Bill Welch

Tim O'Connor
 


I have dozens of photos of SP GS gondolas - not one of them is patched. I would try to overlay the entire panel
to hide the crack, or perhaps use Future or another clear acrylic to cover it - I have done this with knife scratches and
it has worked well.



On 5/25/2020 1:16 PM, Bill Welch wrote:
I have pretty much completed building a model of one of the SP's G50-15 GS gons using the Detail Associates kit. The G50-15 was the initial group built with the flat plate ends with two rib stiffeners. The quality of styrene used for these kits seems to vary and mine has developed cracks on both sides. I am thinking of making "patch panels" with 0.005 sheet styrene as if the broken panels have been damaged in some fashion and thus repaired. A panel like this would strengthen the side and mask the break.

I am curious if anyone has photos of any SP G series steel sided gons with repaired panels. I am trying to understand if the Southern Pacific repaired panels rather than replacing them and if they did, were the patches welded  or riveted?

Thank you,
Bill Welch

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Welch wrote:

I have pretty much completed building a model of one of the SP's G50-15 GS gons using the Detail Associates kit . . . The quality of styrene used for these kits seems to vary and mine has developed cracks on both sides.

      This results from excessive recycling of scrap styrene moldings. Dennis can tell us much more about this if he wishes. My own approach might be to try and fill and smooth the cracks and try to hide what happened that way.

I am curious if anyone has photos of any SP G series steel sided gons with repaired panels. I am trying to understand if the Southern Pacific repaired panels rather than replacing them and if they did, were the patches welded  or riveted?

      I have never seen a photo of such an SP patch, Bill, though I do know of two photos which seem to show replaced panels.

Tony Thompson



 

Tony Thompson wrote;

This results from excessive recycling of scrap styrene moldings

DA did use regrind plastic when they did kits and parts. The brittleness runs across their parts line. The handbrake sets also suffer breakage issues.

The DA AB brake sets were done by Grandt Line and do not seem to have this problem.

I have over 20 of the DA gons and back in the '90's, they sent me a fair # of replacement parts for plastic that was broken in brand new kits.

I don't think they will still do that.

Dan Smith

Bill Welch
 

Okay, here is my plan:

—Measure the interior width with Digital Caliper
—Take the measure to Home Depot and ask them to cut a scrap of wood to that width to fit into the body cavity to prevent the styrene from flexing
—Sand the glued cracks with #600 sandpaper
—brush on "Future/Pledge whatever they are calling it this week"
—apply clear decal material
—Prime. paint, decal and move on. . .

Bill Welch

Tim O'Connor
 


The DA freight car ladders - very fine parts - are also extremely prone to breakage. I never knew it was just
crummy (crumbly?) plastic. But since the problem never seems to happen with Kadee ladders, I now see the
wisdom of this explanation.


On 5/25/2020 2:01 PM, Dan Smith wrote:
Tony Thompson wrote;

This results from excessive recycling of scrap styrene moldings

DA did use regrind plastic when they did kits and parts. The brittleness runs across their parts line. The handbrake sets also suffer breakage issues.

The DA AB brake sets were done by Grandt Line and do not seem to have this problem.

I have over 20 of the DA gons and back in the '90's, they sent me a fair # of replacement parts for plastic that was broken in brand new kits.

I don't think they will still do that.

Dan Smith


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

dh30973
 

A good portion of the DA parts were re packaged Grandt Line parts. Same parts, just less in the package. Grandt did use re-grind for some of their parts, not saying which. Before I bought Cannon and Company after Gordon’s death, he told me he saved his sprues and incomplete parts to take to Grandt. So they could re grind them. Gordon never used re grind. 

Some of the other DA parts were made by another tool maker, Joel Berling, who also used regrind. But he did not do the gondola.

Dave Hussey

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

The DA freight car ladders - very fine parts - are also extremely prone to breakage. I never knew it was just
crummy (crumbly?) plastic. But since the problem never seems to happen with Kadee ladders, I now see the
wisdom of this explanation.

    Kadee does recycle sprues etc. into virgin styrene, but only ONCE. The excess from THAT batch is all scrapped. Then excess from the following virgin batch can be recycled once, and so on. Any other process degrades the styrene.

Tony Thompson