Sp Box Car 83627


Lester Breuer
 

I expanded  the Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company  roster with a freight car a purchased from the Jim Hayes estate.  An Innovative Model Works (IMWX) Southern Pacific Box Car numbered 83627 that Jim built. A model produced for the La Mesa Model Railroad Club in the 1948 paint scheme.  I replaced the B end retainer line (as broken) and the brake rod with wire ones.  I also replaced the underbody detail with wire piping, brake levers, brake rods and added chain.  I used Tichy Train Group phosphor bronze wire.  A light weathering with Pans Pastels Payne’s Grey Extra Dark with makeup brush and SP 83627 went into service.

 

Lester Breuer

 


Paul Doggett
 

Lester 

That looks really nice.

Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 24 Jan 2022, at 17:16, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:



I expanded  the Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company  roster with a freight car a purchased from the Jim Hayes estate.  An Innovative Model Works (IMWX) Southern Pacific Box Car numbered 83627 that Jim built. A model produced for the La Mesa Model Railroad Club in the 1948 paint scheme.  I replaced the B end retainer line (as broken) and the brake rod with wire ones.  I also replaced the underbody detail with wire piping, brake levers, brake rods and added chain.  I used Tichy Train Group phosphor bronze wire.  A light weathering with Pans Pastels Payne’s Grey Extra Dark with makeup brush and SP 83627 went into service.

 

Lester Breuer

 

Attachments:


Jay Styron
 

Lester,
Don’t forget to route the car to Bakersfield when empty, as stenciled!
Nice job…
-Jay Styron
La Mesa Model Railroad Club


Tony Thompson
 

Jay Styron wrote:

Lester,
Don’t forget to route the car to Bakersfield when empty, as stenciled!
Nice job…
Good point, Jay! But also don’t forget what one former employee told me about such stencils: "Sure, we’d follow it if it was convenient."

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Jay Styron
 

I am doing some research at the club to find out what the origin of this stencil was. The other night, no one knew. Will advise.
-Jay Styron


Todd Sullivan
 

I have the same or a similar kit with the same stencil.  My thought has been that the car was assigned to carry petroleum products in barrels, and that the producer was located in Bakersfield.  When clerking in Portland, OR in the1960s, I saw a few SP 50ft DD boxcars with similar stencils.

Todd Sullivan


Tim O'Connor
 


Would this type of stencil indicate a fairly temporary assignment?

I ask that because SP basically used the 600000 series numbers to keep track of assigned
cars - cars would be renumbered from the 100000's or whatever into the 600000's and
then be returned to their original numbers when the assignments ended. Some cars were
renumbered several times. These assignments could be commodity based (like paper
loading, or rubber, or whatever) while some cars had location assignments.

Tim O'Connor

On 1/26/2022 12:00 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:
I have the same or a similar kit with the same stencil.  My thought has been that the car was assigned to carry petroleum products in barrels, and that the producer was located in Bakersfield.  When clerking in Portland, OR in the1960s, I saw a few SP 50ft DD boxcars with similar stencils.

Todd Sullivan

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Jay Styron
 

I spoke to John Cathcart, former Car Shop Foreman for the La Mesa Club about these placarded boxcars.  He was involved in the creation of these cars as a fund raising project for the club.  He said the placards were not based on any specific service, but gave an example of how they might be used:
The Monolith cement plant, railroad east of Tehachapi, would order carloads of new cement bags. When the car was made empty at the plant, the customer wanted to load the empty car with full bags of cement.  The railroad didn't want these clean cars used in this way, because they would be too contaminated to use for clean lading (ie, new bags).  The placard would direct the empty car, in this case, to Bakersfield.  Which leaves open the question as to whether anyone paid attention to the placard.
-Jay Styron


Todd Sullivan
 

Jay,

That's pretty interesting.

When I clerked in Portland in the early 1960s, most of the cars in assigned service, such as bulk feed boxcars for Albers Milling service and flour cars for Crown Flour Mills, were not stenciled as such, but the information was carried on waybills and other paperwork.  The exception was green hide cars, but anyone within 50 yards knew what they were used for.  That actually makes it easier for model RRers, as we don't have to add decal stencils to all assigned cars.

Todd Sullivan


Mark Rossiter
 

Nice work Lester!  Is that a Kadee brake wheel?

 

Mark Rossiter

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 


al_brown03
 

Nice car!

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Lester Breuer
 

I believe it is as did not record in my notes.  I use the Kade brake wheels for 99% of builds I do;  however, the new Tangent brake wheels, in my opinion, compete.  Since purchase I have used them on two builds.  Now, if only Tangent would make a Superior brake wheel.

Lester Breuer


Joseph
 

Red Caboose made them.  CNWHS had them for a while.   I have one left…
Joe

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 10:47 AM Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:
I believe it is as did not record in my notes.  I use the Kade brake wheels for 99% of builds I do;  however, the new Tangent brake wheels, in my opinion, compete.  Since purchase I have used them on two builds.  Now, if only Tangent would make a Superior brake wheel.

Lester Breuer