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Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)


Ray Hutchison
 

There has been fairly recent discussion of sugar beets.  I would think the plants offer great opportunities for modeling of cars, unloading tracks, and other facilities.
I am wondering if anyone has attempted to model sugar beets as car loads? The closest I can think of might be Rice Krispies sealed and painted (now that we have finally gotten rid of our mouse problems) but I think even that would be out of scale?
rh


Mont Switzer
 

I made ear corn loads and corn crib filler out of out of bird seed, painted yellow and glued to Styrofoam fillers.  We took a 2 week trip to FL and Cocoa Beach in January during which time a mouse family apparently house sat for us.  Upon our return we found that the mouse family had feasted on those bird seed loads, paint, glue and all.  A stock car converted to a corn crib had a hole chewed in it.  They ate an entire grain truck load and maybe the styrene sides.  I have yet to find those scratch built sides for the truck.  Fortunately the pot metal truck escaped any damage.  Pot metal must not have met the mouse family’s dietary needs.

 

Guess what I was picking up from the right of way and other locations that accommodate my (mandatory STMFC content) steam era freight cars  with tweezers?  Great way to foul a switch.

 

So, you might want to look for something a little less enticing.

 

Mont    

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Hutchison
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 8:17 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

There has been fairly recent discussion of sugar beets.  I would think the plants offer great opportunities for modeling of cars, unloading tracks, and other facilities.
I am wondering if anyone has attempted to model sugar beets as car loads? The closest I can think of might be Rice Krispies sealed and painted (now that we have finally gotten rid of our mouse problems) but I think even that would be out of scale?
rh


Todd Sullivan
 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Charles Happel
 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown


On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Joseph
 

Spider poop on models is also a problem for my stuff in display cases.  I am fed up with the 8 legged menace!

A fellow from Bird Island MN used fennel seeds to represent sugar beets.  Dowsed  in flat finish on a strip of plastic or wood painted appropriately 

Joe Binish
New Hope, MN

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 10:04 AM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Mont Switzer
 

Todd and all,

 

Hmmm.  Maybe that is why I have a few mystery dead spots even after the track cleaner has done its thing.  I hate to think of it, but maybe a closer inspection is in order.

 

Mont    

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Mont Switzer
 

Good suggestion.  I do this for my historic vehicles.  For the basement I called ORKIN.  Took care of rodents and insects.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Happel via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

 

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


mel perry
 

get a cat
;-)
mel perry

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020, 8:17 AM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:

Good suggestion.  I do this for my historic vehicles.  For the basement I called ORKIN.  Took care of rodents and insects.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Happel via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

 

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Bob Chaparro
 

Some modelers have used anise seeds for sugar beets. Anise seeds are used as a spice.

Photo:

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0053/1247/9325/products/aniseseeds.jpg?v=1587829018

I have no idea if mice prefer these seeds.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Douglas Harding
 

I have been using Anise seeds for sugar beet loads. I cut a piece of foam to fit the car, paint it dark brown. Then coat with glue and sprinkle anise seed. A second application of anise covers areas missed the first time.

 

I have no issues or problems with undesirables. My wife puts out small caps of vinegar which keeps the spiders away. And our four legged pets keep the mice away.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 1:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Some modelers have used anise seeds for sugar beets. Anise seeds are used as a spice.

Photo:

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0053/1247/9325/products/aniseseeds.jpg?v=1587829018

I have no idea if mice prefer these seeds.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Steve Wolcott
 

I made a master for a beet load using short-grain rice.  That's for S-scale, probably too big for HO. https://www.pre-size.com/products/SscaleCar_Loads.php   The same could be done with anise seed in HO.  Make a master and cast the loads with resin.  Then get the seed/rice out of the train room.
Steve Wolcott


Tim O'Connor
 


looks good! I've never liked the idea of putting anything edible on the train table... Mice will eat
just about anything. Good looking resin beet loads would be great for HO scale :-)


On 12/31/2020 8:34 PM, Steve Wolcott wrote:
I made a master for a beet load using short-grain rice.  That's for S-scale, probably too big for HO. https://www.pre-size.com/products/SscaleCar_Loads.php   The same could be done with anise seed in HO.  Make a master and cast the loads with resin.  Then get the seed/rice out of the train room.
Steve Wolcott


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tony Thompson
 

     Almost all natural or seed products are too regular to model real sugar beets, which are, as someone said, carrots on steroids. They are strongly conical and quite variable in size. To see a good prototype photo, you may consult one of my blog posts (link below).


For S scale, I think fenugreek could work -- it is a quite irregular natural product -- but really too large for HO scale. I have tried it, and the color and shapes are pretty good, but really too big. I showed my fenugreek load in a blog post, though I really am happier with the old Chooch resin loads. (The latter are discussed in the blog post above). Here is the link to the fenugreek post:


The real "roots" (as SP crews called them) are dirty as well as irregular shapes, and I think modeling them really well is a definite challenge.

Tony Thompson




Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

looks good! I've never liked the idea of putting anything edible on the train table... Mice will eat
just about anything. Good looking resin beet loads would be great for HO scale :-)

   Such loads were indeed offered by Chooch, and often show up on eBay. I think they are pretty good.

Tony Thompson




Jerry Michels
 

There is no specific size limitation to sugar beets.  I hand harvested acres as a grad student working field research on sugar beet root maggot. All depends on if the farmer had a good year of sun and plenty of water. Largest I ever saw were about a foot long  Tapering slowly from a good foot at the top to the end of the root. By the way, raw sugar beet root has no sweet taste, pretty bland.  The leaves, though taste similar to chard.  Jerry Michels


Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

I'll look for the Chooch loads.

I wonder if a realistic sugar beet load can be done in 3-D printing. How would one specify
a highly irregular 3-D image to a machine?



On 1/2/2021 3:19 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:

looks good! I've never liked the idea of putting anything edible on the train table... Mice will eat
just about anything. Good looking resin beet loads would be great for HO scale :-)

   Such loads were indeed offered by Chooch, and often show up on eBay. I think they are pretty good.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


akerboomk
 

RE: sugar beets to 3D printer.

 

What I would do…

In 3D CAD, make one or 2 individual beets (probably a “profile” spline and a revolve would be enough?)

Then make a bunch scaled up/down (possibly non-uniform scale to get long-thin and short-fat ones as well as big & small)

Then make a “pile” (just a surface to use as a base) to fit your car (maybe 2 or 3 for “variety”)

Then (not sure how the “free” programs do this) start assembling various size beet models to the base. (this would be the hardest part)

“Fill in” underneath them (3D printing software may do this for you?)

Print away...

 

You may be able to scale the model (non-uniformly) to fit other cars.

 

 

 


--
Ken Akerboom