Topics

Tetra Ethyl lead cars (Was Conoco)

akerboomk
 

Garth –

I was somewhere (NMRA? RPM?) where Scott Chatfield talked about tank cars, and he covered some Tetraethyl lead cars (among others)

To your questions:

-       They were small (IIRC the cars he talked about were 4000 gal, but I may be wrong)

-       The cars he talked about were not lined

-       The cars he talked about were contaminated

-       When they were “end of lifed” (IIRC due to 40/50 year rule), they were disposed of in a “creative” way.

 

I’d rather not say how…

 

Ken


--
Ken Akerboom

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Ken,

EBAX 3197, the car I shot, is not in my 1958 ORER. That said, I just took a look at the EBAX roster there. While there are a number of 3,000 gallon cars, most are 6,000. Most are ICC 105A300W TPI cars, though a few of the 3K cars are ICC105A300, which AIUI means they are riveted. They have the lowest numbers, suggesting they are the oldest cars in the fleet. Not surprisingly, the majority of the 831 car fleet are restricted to carrying "Motor Fuel Anti-Knock Compound", that is tetraethyllead. There are a few cars listed as carrying metalic sodium, ethyl chloride, Muriatic Acid, and chlorine gas, which I presume are constituent chemicals used to make anti-knock compounds, or are by-products of the process being shipped to other industries. These cars ranged from 7 to 11K.

By the way, there was also an Ethyl Corporation of Canada which rostered 42 cars under the ECCX mark. All are indicated as for tetraethyllead. They are all 3K or 6K cars classed as ICC 105A300W TPI.

I did not know about DuPont making this stuff, but I remember that I saw some of their cars on the WP as well. Dupont had a large chemical plant somewhere west of Pittsburg, and I have some shots of one of their locomotives. This might have been where their cars in the WP trains were headed. Of  course, DuPont made a lot of other nasty stuff as well as tetraethyllead. I have some negatives somewhere, and I will probably get to them in my next big scan campaign later this year when I start work on my California stuff from the 1960s and 1970s.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 12:00 PM akerboomk <ken-akerboom@...> wrote:

Garth –

I was somewhere (NMRA? RPM?) where Scott Chatfield talked about tank cars, and he covered some Tetraethyl lead cars (among others)

To your questions:

-       They were small (IIRC the cars he talked about were 4000 gal, but I may be wrong)

-       The cars he talked about were not lined

-       The cars he talked about were contaminated

-       When they were “end of lifed” (IIRC due to 40/50 year rule), they were disposed of in a “creative” way.

 

I’d rather not say how…

 

Ken


--
Ken Akerboom

Tim O'Connor
 


Just FYI the EBAX tetraethyl lead tank cars were still in revenue service into the 1990's. I photographed one,
a 3,000 gallon size car, in Tacoma in 1992.


On 6/27/2020 1:52 PM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
Ken,

EBAX 3197, the car I shot, is not in my 1958 ORER. That said, I just took a look at the EBAX roster there. While there are a number of 3,000 gallon cars, most are 6,000. Most are ICC 105A300W TPI cars, though a few of the 3K cars are ICC105A300, which AIUI means they are riveted. They have the lowest numbers, suggesting they are the oldest cars in the fleet. Not surprisingly, the majority of the 831 car fleet are restricted to carrying "Motor Fuel Anti-Knock Compound", that is tetraethyllead. There are a few cars listed as carrying metalic sodium, ethyl chloride, Muriatic Acid, and chlorine gas, which I presume are constituent chemicals used to make anti-knock compounds, or are by-products of the process being shipped to other industries. These cars ranged from 7 to 11K.

By the way, there was also an Ethyl Corporation of Canada which rostered 42 cars under the ECCX mark. All are indicated as for tetraethyllead. They are all 3K or 6K cars classed as ICC 105A300W TPI.

I did not know about DuPont making this stuff, but I remember that I saw some of their cars on the WP as well. Dupont had a large chemical plant somewhere west of Pittsburg, and I have some shots of one of their locomotives. This might have been where their cars in the WP trains were headed. Of  course, DuPont made a lot of other nasty stuff as well as tetraethyllead. I have some negatives somewhere, and I will probably get to them in my next big scan campaign later this year when I start work on my California stuff from the 1960s and 1970s.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts