Topics

Train Shed Cyclopedias

bhom3@...
 

Warren,

Thanks for asking this question - after sitting in on clincs at the
San Jose national and seeing the large attendance by modelers fairly
new to prototype modeling and listening to some of their questions,
I've been working on an article (intended as the first in an ongoing
series on a systematic approach on building a steam era boxcar fleet
for the modeler just getting into prototype modeling). My
premise: "If I was starting from scratch in prototype railroad
modeling and wanted a research library, which items do I absolutely
need that I can readily find at a reasonable price?" As Byron's
detailed in his excellent post, there is a lot out there. Over the
last fifteen years, there has been an explosion in the quantity and
quality of freight car information available - unlike fifteen years
ago, where you were searching for a needle in a haystack because
information you're looking for isn't readily available or surces
haven't been identified yet, today it's the opposite problem - you
have so much information out there that things sometimes get lost in
the volume (this problem I'd much rather have). The challenge for
the new prototype modeler is to "get the most bang for the buck" for
his research material. Unfortunately, there isn't anything nearly as
economical as the Squadron "In Action" series (I also started as a
scale modeler, and still keep a shelf of them when I feel the need
for a change of pace). Byron hit many of the really good pubs out
there - here's a few more:

NEB&W Guide to Steam Era Freight Cars: Even if I weren't a member of
the RPI society, I'd still give this series my highest
recommendation. These represent almost 20 years of research towards
creating a realistic freight car fleet for the NEB&W, growing from a
series of notes made by Todd Sullivan on which prototypes are
represented by which kits. From this beginning, John Nehrich has
expanded and updated these into 4 sizable volumes of information
covering everything from suitability of kits, paint schemes, freight
car evolution, developing a model freight car fleet, etc., etc..
Even though these contain no color photos (an unfortunate by-product
of operating on a shoestring budget provided by the Institute), the
sheer amount of information makes these a great bargain for the
price. One nice feature of the guide is that John takes pains to
reference articles in the hobby press, which makes sifting through
the pile of magazine back issues much less painful. For more info
(an an online guide to steam era freight car kits), go to
http://www.union.rpi.edu/railroad/ .

Official Railway Equipment Registers: Once only available as
originals on a catch-as-can basis at railroadiana shows (at a premium
price), many of these are now available on CD (various issues -
August 1888 to Janauary 1959, PRR 1893-1926, PRR 1927-1950) from Al
Westerfield (http://users.multipro.com/westerfield/), and the January
1953 issue in paper from the NMRA
(http://jdb.psu.edu/nmra/orer.html). These are listings for all
railroads operating of freight cars in revenue interchange service
and contain a treasure trove of information from number series,
dimensions, specially equipped cars, and interchange connections.
These are not stand alone publications from the modeler's point of
view because they do not contain diagrams or pictures, but they
multiply the effectiveness of the rest of your references because
they give you the big picture. I highly recommend obtaining a copy
of an ORER for the years you're interested in modeling.

Equipment Diagram Books: Many historical societies offer
reproduction equipment diagram books, and Wayner has PRR diagram book
as well. Again, these aren't stand alone because the diagrams are
not scale drawings but general arrangments, but they are an excellent
representation of a particular road's fleet.

Westerfield Data Sheets: Al offers his outstanding decals
separately, and he includes his data sheets with them, which are
easily worth the price of his kits, much less the decals!


Judging from your last post, you're on the right track with the L&N
Historical Society. As for other roads, I'd pick up the first volume
of the NEB&W Guide, a copy of the ORER for the year(s) I'm interested
in from Westerfield, and start with learning more about the roads
that connect with the sections of the L&N, NC&StL, and TC that you're
interested in, as well as the roads with major car fleets (PRR, NYC,
B&O, ATSF, SP).

Welcome aboard! (I also came to the same conclusion about my
aircraft and ship models - I very well couldn't refight the Battle of
Midway with my 1/72 aircraft collection either).


Ben Hom


P.S. - Comments welcome from the list at large - ask yourself the
same question!

byronrose@...
 

Allow me to disagree with Lt Ben. I don't think there is any need for a
modeler to own either equipment registers or diagram books until they are
familiar with and have built all the available kits for their interests
and are looking for something else to do. There is just too much
information in those very specialized books for a newcomer to make any
kind of use of and it will only complicate an already difficult learning
period. Basically the same reason not to bother with the Train Sheds at
this point of your education.

Learn all you can about freight cars from photos and articles relating to
them and modeling. Once you are conversant and comfortable dealing with
them, then you can get into the esoteric stuff. Believe me, you'll go
nuts trying to determine where the width of a flat car is measured from
until you are familiar with the anatomy of a flat car.

And why the heck can't you fight the Battle of Midway with your 1/72
models? I do it every night in the tub with my 1/48 models. Coral Sea
too, but I have to remove the meatballs from thr models.

Trust me, I'm an RPA.

BSR


On Wed, 10 Jan 2001 20:39:11 -0000 bhom3@... writes:

Warren,

Thanks for asking this question - after sitting in on clincs at the
San Jose national and seeing the large attendance by modelers fairly

new to prototype modeling and listening to some of their questions,
I've been working on an article (intended as the first in an ongoing

series on a systematic approach on building a steam era boxcar fleet

for the modeler just getting into prototype modeling). My
premise: "If I was starting from scratch in prototype railroad
modeling and wanted a research library, which items do I absolutely
need that I can readily find at a reasonable price?" As Byron's
detailed in his excellent post, there is a lot out there. Over the
last fifteen years, there has been an explosion in the quantity and
quality of freight car information available - unlike fifteen years
ago, where you were searching for a needle in a haystack because
information you're looking for isn't readily available or surces
haven't been identified yet, today it's the opposite problem - you
have so much information out there that things sometimes get lost in

the volume (this problem I'd much rather have). The challenge for
the new prototype modeler is to "get the most bang for the buck" for

his research material. Unfortunately, there isn't anything nearly
as
economical as the Squadron "In Action" series (I also started as a
scale modeler, and still keep a shelf of them when I feel the need
for a change of pace). Byron hit many of the really good pubs out
there - here's a few more:

NEB&W Guide to Steam Era Freight Cars: Even if I weren't a member
of
the RPI society, I'd still give this series my highest
recommendation. These represent almost 20 years of research towards

creating a realistic freight car fleet for the NEB&W, growing from a

series of notes made by Todd Sullivan on which prototypes are
represented by which kits. From this beginning, John Nehrich has
expanded and updated these into 4 sizable volumes of information
covering everything from suitability of kits, paint schemes, freight

car evolution, developing a model freight car fleet, etc., etc..
Even though these contain no color photos (an unfortunate by-product

of operating on a shoestring budget provided by the Institute), the
sheer amount of information makes these a great bargain for the
price. One nice feature of the guide is that John takes pains to
reference articles in the hobby press, which makes sifting through
the pile of magazine back issues much less painful. For more info
(an an online guide to steam era freight car kits), go to
http://www.union.rpi.edu/railroad/ .

Official Railway Equipment Registers: Once only available as
originals on a catch-as-can basis at railroadiana shows (at a
premium
price), many of these are now available on CD (various issues -
August 1888 to Janauary 1959, PRR 1893-1926, PRR 1927-1950) from Al
Westerfield (http://users.multipro.com/westerfield/), and the
January
1953 issue in paper from the NMRA
(http://jdb.psu.edu/nmra/orer.html). These are listings for all
railroads operating of freight cars in revenue interchange service
and contain a treasure trove of information from number series,
dimensions, specially equipped cars, and interchange connections.
These are not stand alone publications from the modeler's point of
view because they do not contain diagrams or pictures, but they
multiply the effectiveness of the rest of your references because
they give you the big picture. I highly recommend obtaining a copy
of an ORER for the years you're interested in modeling.

Equipment Diagram Books: Many historical societies offer
reproduction equipment diagram books, and Wayner has PRR diagram
book
as well. Again, these aren't stand alone because the diagrams are
not scale drawings but general arrangments, but they are an
excellent
representation of a particular road's fleet.

Westerfield Data Sheets: Al offers his outstanding decals
separately, and he includes his data sheets with them, which are
easily worth the price of his kits, much less the decals!


Judging from your last post, you're on the right track with the L&N
Historical Society. As for other roads, I'd pick up the first
volume
of the NEB&W Guide, a copy of the ORER for the year(s) I'm
interested
in from Westerfield, and start with learning more about the roads
that connect with the sections of the L&N, NC&StL, and TC that
you're
interested in, as well as the roads with major car fleets (PRR, NYC,

B&O, ATSF, SP).

Welcome aboard! (I also came to the same conclusion about my
aircraft and ship models - I very well couldn't refight the Battle
of
Midway with my 1/72 aircraft collection either).


Ben Hom


P.S. - Comments welcome from the list at large - ask yourself the
same question!


To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...


________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
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Ted Culotta <ted@...>
 

Ben:

I also recommend looking into your local NMRA chapter. Interest in freight
cars usually begets more interest and many of the experts are not
distributed in an entirely even, random pattern, but rather clustered in
specific areas.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: bhom3@... [mailto:bhom3@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 12:39 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


Warren,

Thanks for asking this question - after sitting in on clincs at the
San Jose national and seeing the large attendance by modelers fairly
new to prototype modeling and listening to some of their questions,
I've been working on an article (intended as the first in an ongoing
series on a systematic approach on building a steam era boxcar fleet
for the modeler just getting into prototype modeling). My
premise: "If I was starting from scratch in prototype railroad
modeling and wanted a research library, which items do I absolutely
need that I can readily find at a reasonable price?" As Byron's
detailed in his excellent post, there is a lot out there. Over the
last fifteen years, there has been an explosion in the quantity and
quality of freight car information available - unlike fifteen years
ago, where you were searching for a needle in a haystack because
information you're looking for isn't readily available or surces
haven't been identified yet, today it's the opposite problem - you
have so much information out there that things sometimes get lost in
the volume (this problem I'd much rather have). The challenge for
the new prototype modeler is to "get the most bang for the buck" for
his research material. Unfortunately, there isn't anything nearly as
economical as the Squadron "In Action" series (I also started as a
scale modeler, and still keep a shelf of them when I feel the need
for a change of pace). Byron hit many of the really good pubs out
there - here's a few more:

NEB&W Guide to Steam Era Freight Cars: Even if I weren't a member of
the RPI society, I'd still give this series my highest
recommendation. These represent almost 20 years of research towards
creating a realistic freight car fleet for the NEB&W, growing from a
series of notes made by Todd Sullivan on which prototypes are
represented by which kits. From this beginning, John Nehrich has
expanded and updated these into 4 sizable volumes of information
covering everything from suitability of kits, paint schemes, freight
car evolution, developing a model freight car fleet, etc., etc..
Even though these contain no color photos (an unfortunate by-product
of operating on a shoestring budget provided by the Institute), the
sheer amount of information makes these a great bargain for the
price. One nice feature of the guide is that John takes pains to
reference articles in the hobby press, which makes sifting through
the pile of magazine back issues much less painful. For more info
(an an online guide to steam era freight car kits), go to
http://www.union.rpi.edu/railroad/ .

Official Railway Equipment Registers: Once only available as
originals on a catch-as-can basis at railroadiana shows (at a premium
price), many of these are now available on CD (various issues -
August 1888 to Janauary 1959, PRR 1893-1926, PRR 1927-1950) from Al
Westerfield (http://users.multipro.com/westerfield/), and the January
1953 issue in paper from the NMRA
(http://jdb.psu.edu/nmra/orer.html). These are listings for all
railroads operating of freight cars in revenue interchange service
and contain a treasure trove of information from number series,
dimensions, specially equipped cars, and interchange connections.
These are not stand alone publications from the modeler's point of
view because they do not contain diagrams or pictures, but they
multiply the effectiveness of the rest of your references because
they give you the big picture. I highly recommend obtaining a copy
of an ORER for the years you're interested in modeling.

Equipment Diagram Books: Many historical societies offer
reproduction equipment diagram books, and Wayner has PRR diagram book
as well. Again, these aren't stand alone because the diagrams are
not scale drawings but general arrangments, but they are an excellent
representation of a particular road's fleet.

Westerfield Data Sheets: Al offers his outstanding decals
separately, and he includes his data sheets with them, which are
easily worth the price of his kits, much less the decals!


Judging from your last post, you're on the right track with the L&N
Historical Society. As for other roads, I'd pick up the first volume
of the NEB&W Guide, a copy of the ORER for the year(s) I'm interested
in from Westerfield, and start with learning more about the roads
that connect with the sections of the L&N, NC&StL, and TC that you're
interested in, as well as the roads with major car fleets (PRR, NYC,
B&O, ATSF, SP).

Welcome aboard! (I also came to the same conclusion about my
aircraft and ship models - I very well couldn't refight the Battle of
Midway with my 1/72 aircraft collection either).


Ben Hom


P.S. - Comments welcome from the list at large - ask yourself the
same question!


To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

Richard Hendrickson
 

Ben Hom's post on sources for freight car research was very well done and,
along with Byron's, should be archived as a national resource.

However, I must respectfully disagree with Byron about the value of Train
Shed Cyclopedias and ORERs for relative newcomers to the subject. Warren
sounds to me like he's hitting the ground running and will be able to make
good use of these documents by next week, if he isn't there already. When
I was just beginning to get interested in freight cars, at a time when very
little information was readily available, I got an ORER for the date I
model, quickly learned how to interpret the data, and used it so much that
I literally wore it out and have since had to replace it. And I
enthusiastically welcomed the advent of the Train Shed Cyclopedias, which I
found to be goldmines of information. The issue is perhaps more one of
intent than experience. Dabblers are easily overwhelmed, and for them
Byron's advice is doubtless appropriate. But Warren doesn't strike me as a
dabbler, especially in view of his extensive experience in other realms of
scale modeling and prototype research, so I'd advise him to go for it.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote

However, I must respectfully disagree with Byron about the value
of Train Shed Cyclopedias and ORERs ...
I concur with Richard, and would say that the TSC's are also a good
way to find out if you'd actually be interested in a Cyclopedia w/o
having to take out a second mortgage. And I love my ORER's and use
them very frequently. My Westerfield CD-ROM 1959 ORER is especially
handy.

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
Marlborough, Massachusetts

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

You might also check the larger libraries. The RPI library has the reprints
of the entire 1879 (or so, I'm not sure of the date), 1880's, and 1906.
They also have in their archives an original 1916.
In buying for an original Cyc, you are paying for the collector's value
of an antique and also a whole lot of pages of not so useful stuff to most
modelers. And the Gregg reprints certainly are easier to lug around, spill
coffee on, etc.
This must have been mentioned, but a subscription to Railmodel Journal
would be one of the top "must-haves".
- John Nehrich

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timoconnor@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 10:27 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


Richard Hendrickson wrote

However, I must respectfully disagree with Byron about the value
of Train Shed Cyclopedias and ORERs ...
I concur with Richard, and would say that the TSC's are also a good
way to find out if you'd actually be interested in a Cyclopedia w/o
having to take out a second mortgage. And I love my ORER's and use
them very frequently. My Westerfield CD-ROM 1959 ORER is especially
handy.

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...


Guy Wilber
 

In a message dated 1/11/01 11:11:43 AM Pacific Standard Time,
ibs4421@... writes:

<< He would make us read "1937 ARA Boxcars In Service" if there was such a
thing. >>

Warren,

We are going to get to you yet...the 1937 box cars were an AAR "Standard",
not ARA. 8^)

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada

byronrose@...
 

On Wed, 10 Jan 2001 22:27:49 -0500 "Tim O'Connor"
<timoconnor@...> writes:
Richard Hendrickson wrote

However, I must respectfully disagree with Byron about the value
of Train Shed Cyclopedias and ORERs ...
I concur with Richard, and would say that the TSC's are also a good
way to find out if you'd actually be interested in a Cyclopedia w/o
having to take out a second mortgage. And I love my ORER's and use
them very frequently. My Westerfield CD-ROM 1959 ORER is especially
handy.
Richard and Tim,

I never said that the Cycs, Train Shed or otherwise, and the ORERs were
not helpful. I only said that I felt that getting into them at too early
a learning stage could dislocate his interest and complicate his learning
curve. If he is in fact not early in the curve, then there should be no
problem.

But I do know that the Cyc drawings can be very intimidating to someone
who is not familiar or knowledgeable with freight car construction.
Check my comment about good people making bad drawings. It has happened
and will continue to happen. What hope has a neophyte to interpret these
drawings (and pages of data) without that necessary grounding in freight
car construction, purpose and operation.

If Warren has all that and is comfortable with it, then I say go for the
yellow (old pages, of course!).

So we all agree after all!

BSR
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Jeff Aley - GCD PE <jaley@...>
 

On Jan 10, 8:39pm, bhom3@... wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias
"If I was starting from scratch in prototype railroad
modeling and wanted a research library, which items do I absolutely
need that I can readily find at a reasonable price?"
A question, and then a few comments.

Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Comments: It seems to me that there are two questions that the beginning
prototype modeler might ask himself (or herself).

1) What should I model?
2) How do I model it?

The first question can be answered simply by choosing a prototype that is
"cool", or it may require extensive research to determine what is
appropriate for a given time in a given location. It is in this area
where ORER's, videos, and photos taken in the chosen location are helpful.

The answer to the second question is "it depends". It behooves one to
know what kits and scratchbuilding supplies are available and applicable.
For this, one should have a Walther's Catalog, with
http://www.walthers.com as a poor substitute. One should also have the
NEB&W Guide that Ben mentioned or at least have a bookmark to their web
site
http://www.union.rpi.edu/railroad/images/rolling-stock/Kits/Kit-Guide.html

Magazines are an excellent resource, as Byron suggests. While in the
process of acquiring magazines, it is helpful to know which issues have
articles you need. To this end, one should make frequent use of the
magazine index at http://index.mrmag.com/ .

The final "general" resource that I would use is a subscription to the
Freight Cars List, where answers to many questions (and sources for
photos) may be found. One may also wish to join the intermodal list, if
one's interests lie in more modern eras.

After these "general" resources, one has to find specific resources, i.e.
those related to the car(s) being modeled. As far as I know, there are no
compact, easily available resources that cover the myriad freight cars
that one might wish to model. There are many books on specific railroads
(Terry Metcalfe's UP book being my personal favorite), and there are many
private collections of information (the Hendrickson Library, for example)
as well as public collections (what's the name of the Canadian library?)
but these do not fit easily onto one's bookshelf. I suppose that this is
why Byron advocates magazines: a magazine collection is the closest thing
you'll find to an archive of specific information on "all kinds" of
freight cars. Next best is the archives of the Freight Cars List, but
unfortunately there are no photos, drawings, or diagrams.


In closing, I will point out the obvious theme of this little commentary:
I rely heavily on resources that are available for FREE on the internet.
I also rely heavily upon the kindness of strangers.[*]

Regards,

-Jeff

[*] Was that line from "A Freightcar named Desire" or from "Cat on a Hot
Diagonal-Panel Roof"?

--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@...
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

Shawn Beckert
 

Jeff Aley asked:

Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never
modeled anything but railroads, so I'm not familiar with
the data contained therein.
Jeff, check out their website at http://www.squadron.com.
In my late teens and early twenties I was heavily into
military aviation, especially naval aircraft, and I thrived
on the Squadron-Signal "In Action" series of publications.
These books would take a particular aircraft, say, the F-4U,
and give a brief but concise history of the plane, then show
photographs of every single variation of the plane. There
were "builders photos" and "action" views, giving the modeler
and historian lots of info to work with.

They do the same thing for ships and armored vehicles. They go
into the kind of detail we're just recently starting to get
about freight cars and locomotives. They have books titled
"P-51 Walk Around" and "F-15 Walk Around" showing nothing but
detail photos of these birds. Imagine if we had a "PS-1 Walk
Around" or an "R-40-23 Walk Around" to browse through!

Shawn Beckert

ibs4421@...
 

Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50 pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile, but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
In my imagined "more perfect world" if these were available for steam
era freight cars, the following would happen, as this is what used to happen
when I built scale models of other subjects:
I would arrive at my hobby shop of choice with money in hand to
purchase a model. OK, so today I'm in a tank car mood, so I stroll on down
the aisle, and there are some undec. P2K 8,000 gal. tank cars. (Hey! I said
it was my perfect world, OK?) I pick up a couple, and then wind my way
over to the magazine & book section. Ahh!, there they are, the new
Hendrickson/Nehrich "In Service" series of horizontal format books on steam
era freight cars. I spin the carousel, and there's the one I want, "Type 21
Tank Cars In Service", and there's a cool painting on the front of a
Shippers Car Line 8K Tank Car sitting in a freight yard w/ a switcher about
to couple on to it. There are two more paintings on the back with captions
each showing a Type 21 Tank Car with different reproting marks or paint
schemes. thumbing through it I notice that it is chock full of B&W photos
of these cars doing what they do best, and covering most of the different
reporting marks and paint schemes throughout their service life. There are
little tech. drawings all through it showing the different little
apputerenances like the plumbing, brakes systems, etc. that were applied to
these cars over time. Yep, just what I need to model a prototypically
correct model in one volume. After purchasing these items, I hop in my car
and head home listening to cool bluegrass music about railroads.
Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos, and
the first generation diesels.
If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>

Warren

ibs4421@...
 

"P-51 Walk Around" and "F-15 Walk Around" showing nothing but
detail photos of these birds. Imagine if we had a "PS-1 Walk
Around" or an "R-40-23 Walk Around" to browse through!

Yes! the "Walk Around" series is really nice. Very, very detail oriented.
LOL, my son has been into them since he could talk. Made his Mom read him
"P-40 In Action for a bedtime story one night. He's into railroads now too.
He would make us read "1937 ARA Boxcars In Service" if there was such a
thing.
Seriously though, I really think someone shoud consider doing this for
railroad modelers. At one time the a/c and armor guys just built what ever
came along without questioning the accuracy like a lot of RR modelers still
do. When Squadron started putting these things out in the early 70's, scale
plastic modeling began to change, and so did the manufacturers efforts.
Starting in the 80's you started seeing much more accurate models coming
out. Of course the big difference is scale modelers ALL want to build
something, it's the whole reason for their existence. With us, building a
prototypically correct freight car is more often thatn not a means to
another end. A lot of folks in the model RR community want stuff as ready
to run as possible. Except fo course, for us!

Warren

Richard Hendrickson
 

Warren (who doubtless has a last name, though he hasn't told us what it is
yet) wrote, about hypothetical RR equivalents of Squadron publications:

....Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos, and
the first generation diesels.
The problem, of course, is sheer numbers. Like it or not, a whole lot more
people are interested in P-51s or even Westland Lysanders (let's see how
many people on this list recognize that one!) than in PS-1s or R-40-23s.
Sizeable circulation enables Squadron to sell their books at moderate
prices, but even breaking even would require comparable RR books to sell
for a lot more, which would further limit the size of their market. So I
don't think such publications are viable...at least, not yet.

If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>
Just say the word and I'll send you my resumé. How do you make a small
fortune in the model RR publishing business? You start with a large
fortune.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

Why kill a tree? I'm hoping that you go into a hobby store, look at the
available selections of a particular type of kit, then ask the owner to go
to our web site and hopefully you can find the most up to date information
about each version (vetted by the gurus on this list with both objective
information and subjective opinions) and this helps you make the choice
that's right for you. And maybe if the owner isn't too willing to have the
internet available to the customers, someday you pull out your wireless palm
whatever and call up the information. - John

----- Original Message -----
From: <ibs4421@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 1:41 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal
format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50
pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of
particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile,
but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
In my imagined "more perfect world" if these were available for steam
era freight cars, the following would happen, as this is what used to
happen
when I built scale models of other subjects:
I would arrive at my hobby shop of choice with money in hand to
purchase a model. OK, so today I'm in a tank car mood, so I stroll on
down
the aisle, and there are some undec. P2K 8,000 gal. tank cars. (Hey! I
said
it was my perfect world, OK?) I pick up a couple, and then wind my way
over to the magazine & book section. Ahh!, there they are, the new
Hendrickson/Nehrich "In Service" series of horizontal format books on
steam
era freight cars. I spin the carousel, and there's the one I want, "Type
21
Tank Cars In Service", and there's a cool painting on the front of a
Shippers Car Line 8K Tank Car sitting in a freight yard w/ a switcher
about
to couple on to it. There are two more paintings on the back with
captions
each showing a Type 21 Tank Car with different reproting marks or paint
schemes. thumbing through it I notice that it is chock full of B&W photos
of these cars doing what they do best, and covering most of the different
reporting marks and paint schemes throughout their service life. There
are
little tech. drawings all through it showing the different little
apputerenances like the plumbing, brakes systems, etc. that were applied
to
these cars over time. Yep, just what I need to model a prototypically
correct model in one volume. After purchasing these items, I hop in my
car
and head home listening to cool bluegrass music about railroads.
Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more
prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as
these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos,
and
the first generation diesels.
If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>

Warren


To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...


ibs4421@...
 

Col. Klink has now ordered Warren to "face The Wall" for ten hours.


We are going to get to you yet...the 1937 box cars were an AAR "Standard",
not ARA. 8^)

ibs4421@...
 

What a cool, but strange a/c the Westland Lysander is. Ya gotta respect
the guys who were willing to fly them on insertions missions though.

Warren Dickinson
Elkton, Kentucky 42220
At the end of the former Guthrie&Elkton Branch, L&N

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Hendrickson" <rhendrickson@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 1:51 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


Warren (who doubtless has a last name, though he hasn't told us what it is
yet) wrote, about hypothetical RR equivalents of Squadron publications:

....Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more
prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as
these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos, and
the first generation diesels.
The problem, of course, is sheer numbers. Like it or not, a whole lot more
people are interested in P-51s or even Westland Lysanders (let's see how
many people on this list recognize that one!) than in PS-1s or R-40-23s.
Sizeable circulation enables Squadron to sell their books at moderate
prices, but even breaking even would require comparable RR books to sell
for a lot more, which would further limit the size of their market. So I
don't think such publications are viable...at least, not yet.

If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>
Just say the word and I'll send you my resum�. How do you make a small
fortune in the model RR publishing business? You start with a large
fortune.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520



To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

Shawn Beckert
 

Richard "Dawn Patrol" Hendrickson wrote:

...Like it or not, a whole lot more people are
interested in P-51s or even Westland Lysanders
(let's see how many people on this list recognize
that one!) than in PS-1's or R-40-23's.
Me, for one. Butt ugly airplane; for looks I'll take
the Hawker Sea Fury, since we're talking British
aircraft. Different function, of course.

Mandatory Freight Car Content (do we have that here?):
Remember the little booklets that Westside used to put
out on the prototype history of some of their brass
imports? What if someone were to take the same approach
to freight cars, say a small publication on Type 21 or
Type 27 tank cars, or the PS-1, since I mentioned it?

Surely you could sell enough of those amongst us purists
to make a profit from it?

Shawn Beckert

Jeff Aley - GCD PE <jaley@...>
 

I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.

In addition, I'm guessing that there are a lot more different kinds of
freight cars to be covered. A lot of roads had cars built in their own
shops that aren't very similar to anyone else's car.

I would expect to see something about diesels long before we see such
books about freight cars, as the "diesel problem" is much more tractable.

Regards,

-Jeff



On Jan 11, 12:41pm, <ibs4421@...> wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias
Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled
anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal
format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50
pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions
beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of
particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the
a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile,
but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@...
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

Also I'm not sure the other hobbies have something akin to an ORER to let
one track car series. (Okay, maybe something like Jane's Fighting Ships or
what - not my hobby, so I'm not sure - but certainly I would not think for
armour.) - John

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff Aley - GCD PE" <jaley@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 4:14 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.

In addition, I'm guessing that there are a lot more different kinds of
freight cars to be covered. A lot of roads had cars built in their own
shops that aren't very similar to anyone else's car.

I would expect to see something about diesels long before we see such
books about freight cars, as the "diesel problem" is much more tractable.

Regards,

-Jeff



On Jan 11, 12:41pm, <ibs4421@...> wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias
Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled
anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal
format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50
pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions
beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of
particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the
a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile,
but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@...
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...


Richard Hendrickson
 

I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.
Hello? Earth to Jeff. I'm no expert on armor, but I do know a good bit
about aircraft, and I can assure you that there were endless variations on
equipment,paint, insignia, etc. even on relatively low production aircraft,
not to mention planes that were built by the thousands like the P-51, B-25,
B-17, etc. Documenting the variations on PS-1s would be child's play
compared to doing the same for, say, Curtiss P-40s, which had twenty-some
major production variants, were used by many allied air forces, and
appeared in so many paint schemes that it's a monumental task to document
even the ones for which photographic and other evidence survives.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520