Tru-Color Primer Questions


Ken Adams
 

I was going through the paint section in my local hobby shop and I came upon a rattle can of TCP-4011 Dark Primer.  This was new to me as I had no previous knowledge that TCP was making any primers. My standard has been the Tamiya series of surface primers which have worked well for the last 10 years for me. 

Has anyone had relatable experience with the Tru-Color primers and TCP-4011 Dark Primer in particular. Does it have as good a spray nozzle as the very reliable Tamiya fine spray products.  Does it coat well on a single pass over raw grey plastic models? Is the spray at least as fine as the Tamiya primers? The LHS clerk thought it is an even finer spray than the Tamiya primers. 

Does anyone know the provenance of the Tamiya spray can primers. On the Can it says it is made for manufactured for Tru-Color Paint but no actual location of manufacture is indicated.  Is it truly a US/North American manufactured product.  Of course I know very well that Tamiya is Japanese in origin and with recent problems with international/intercontinental supply chains I am always anxious to develop US/North American product sources whenever possible even if just as a backup. 

Looking forward to answers from other modelers who have actually tried the Tru-Color rattle can primer product.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Kevin Macomber
 

They are industry standard nozzles, but my recommendation is to use the primer in the bottle and use your airbrush. I think there is better control of thin coats.

Tru-Color is made by them.

More importantly do not mix brands of paint. If your top coat is TC, your primer should be TC. I sell a great deal of their paint and spent time addressing the differences as many of my customers still use Floquil. If you use the same approaches as other paints, you will not get the best results.

Here are some details I have posted.
https://www.narrowgaugemodeling.com/tru-color-paint/

Kevin
NGMC

On 2022-06-25 17:20, Ken Adams wrote:
I was going through the paint section in my local hobby shop and I
came upon a rattle can of TCP-4011 Dark Primer. This was new to me as
I had no previous knowledge that TCP was making any primers. My
standard has been the Tamiya series of surface primers which have
worked well for the last 10 years for me.
Has anyone had relatable experience with the Tru-Color primers and
TCP-4011 Dark Primer in particular. Does it have as good a spray
nozzle as the very reliable Tamiya fine spray products. Does it coat
well on a single pass over raw grey plastic models? Is the spray at
least as fine as the Tamiya primers? The LHS clerk thought it is an
even finer spray than the Tamiya primers.
Does anyone know the provenance of the Tamiya spray can primers. On
the Can it says it is made for manufactured for Tru-Color Paint but no
actual location of manufacture is indicated. Is it truly a US/North
American manufactured product. Of course I know very well that Tamiya
is Japanese in origin and with recent problems with
international/intercontinental supply chains I am always anxious to
develop US/North American product sources whenever possible even if
just as a backup.
Looking forward to answers from other modelers who have actually tried
the Tru-Color rattle can primer product.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid
Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io
Links:
------
[1] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/message/193518
[2] https://groups.io/mt/91992102/645454
[3] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/post
[4] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/editsub/645454
[5] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/leave/11334620/645454/765963421/xyzzy
--
Kevin Macomber
NGMC
(717) 474-8399
www.narrowgaugemodeling.com


Ken Adams
 

Kevin

I would beg to disagree about Tamiya nozzles.  The nozzle question has been debated over and over again in non-model railroad modeling forums. There has also been a proliferation of proprietary paint system nozzles.  Some work.  Some don't. 

Also, for a variety of reasons including health I do not use an airbrush unless there is absolutely no other alternative. Brush-able acrylics have allowed me to continue model building in model railroading as a hobby. I have and have had many airbrushes over the last 67 years I have been a modeler. I don't particularly care to use them and am able to get most satisfactory results in the same manner as the pre-1950's prototype usually did, by hand brushing. When I need to use a rattle can I go out on my townhouse deck and brave the prevailing wind primarily for primer coats.

And in most cases regardless of the primer I and many others will be brush painting the top coat with an acrylic such as from Vallejo, AK or one of the other brands favored by vehicle, armor and war game modelers. Many other model railroaders are now discovering that brushing is a fast simple alternative for painting rolling stock and structures.

I have tried Tru-Color brushable paints and unfortunately found they did not match the European brands such as Vallejo and AK in leveling ability to eliminate brush stroke marks and single coat coverage.  The long gone Polly Scale was thicker and used to work but in some cases left brush marks. I used to use it primarily on structures.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Kevin Macomber
 

One of the things I have observed over the years is modelers use what they feel comfortable with. This is how we became the largest reseller of out of production paint in the US with typically about 8500-9000 bottles of paint on the shelf.

-K

On 2022-06-25 19:51, Ken Adams wrote:
Kevin
I would beg to disagree about Tamiya nozzles. The nozzle question has
been debated over and over again in non-model railroad modeling
forums. There has also been a proliferation of proprietary paint
system nozzles. Some work. Some don't.
Also, for a variety of reasons including health I do not use an
airbrush unless there is absolutely no other alternative. Brush-able
acrylics have allowed me to continue model building in model
railroading as a hobby. I have and have had many airbrushes over the
last 67 years I have been a modeler. I don't particularly care to use
them and am able to get most satisfactory results in the same manner
as the pre-1950's prototype usually did, by hand brushing. When I need
to use a rattle can I go out on my townhouse deck and brave the
prevailing wind primarily for primer coats.
And in most cases regardless of the primer I and many others will be
brush painting the top coat with an acrylic such as from Vallejo, AK
or one of the other brands favored by vehicle, armor and war game
modelers. Many other model railroaders are now discovering that
brushing is a fast simple alternative for painting rolling stock and
structures.
I have tried Tru-Color brushable paints and unfortunately found they
did not match the European brands such as Vallejo and AK in leveling
ability to eliminate brush stroke marks and single coat coverage. The
long gone Polly Scale was thicker and used to work but in some cases
left brush marks. I used to use it primarily on structures.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid
Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io
Links:
------
[1] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/message/193523
[2] https://groups.io/mt/91992102/645454
[3] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/post
[4] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/editsub/645454
[5] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/leave/11334620/645454/765963421/xyzzy
--
Kevin Macomber
NGMC
(717) 474-8399
www.narrowgaugemodeling.com