Topics

Tugs on Flatcars

Andy Laurent
 

Gents,

I found an interesting image of two US Army tugboats on 3 flatcars on the Wisconsin Maritime Museum's web archive. This is on the Ahnapee & Western Railway in Sturgeon Bay, WI in 1943. Hulls on the end cars, pilot houses on the center car.  I would assume that the openings in the deck would have been covered with canvas.  Could be a nice project for those little Sylvan tug kits.

https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/photo/AC9F4214-546F-46BF-B409-355078807411 

from the collection: https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/vocabulary 

Cheers,
Andy L
Wisconsin

Bruce Smith
 

Andy,


Awesome photo!  Here are two shots from the Signal Corps Archives, formerly available through the Library of Va, showing two identical vessels on flat cars awaiting shipment at Portsmouth VA. In this case, the location of the pilot houses is covered by a "tent" of what appears to be plywood.


Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Andy Laurent via Groups.Io <andy.laurent@...>
Sent: Monday, September 2, 2019 9:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Tugs on Flatcars
 
Gents,

I found an interesting image of two US Army tugboats on 3 flatcars on the Wisconsin Maritime Museum's web archive. This is on the Ahnapee & Western Railway in Sturgeon Bay, WI in 1943. Hulls on the end cars, pilot houses on the center car.  I would assume that the openings in the deck would have been covered with canvas.  Could be a nice project for those little Sylvan tug kits.

https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/photo/AC9F4214-546F-46BF-B409-355078807411 

from the collection: https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/vocabulary 

Cheers,
Andy L
Wisconsin

Bruce Smith
 

Let's try adding the photos 😉


From: Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Monday, September 2, 2019 4:44:32 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tugs on Flatcars
 

Andy,


Awesome photo!  Here are two shots from the Signal Corps Archives, formerly available through the Library of Va, showing two identical vessels on flat cars awaiting shipment at Portsmouth VA. In this case, the location of the pilot houses is covered by a "tent" of what appears to be plywood.


Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Andy Laurent via Groups.Io <andy.laurent@...>
Sent: Monday, September 2, 2019 9:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Tugs on Flatcars
 
Gents,

I found an interesting image of two US Army tugboats on 3 flatcars on the Wisconsin Maritime Museum's web archive. This is on the Ahnapee & Western Railway in Sturgeon Bay, WI in 1943. Hulls on the end cars, pilot houses on the center car.  I would assume that the openings in the deck would have been covered with canvas.  Could be a nice project for those little Sylvan tug kits.

https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/photo/AC9F4214-546F-46BF-B409-355078807411 

from the collection: https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/vocabulary 

Cheers,
Andy L
Wisconsin

Bill Welch
 

I did know the Army had its own Navy.

Bill Welch

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

They had, and have, a variety of landing craft and combat engineering vessels. Separately, but don’t forget the Army Engineers with their fleet of dredges, snag boats, and support craft.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Sep 2, 2019, at 5:45 PM, Bruce Smith <@smithbf> wrote:

<tugboats on flats.jpg>

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Sep 2, 2019, at 15:37, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I did know the Army had its own Navy.
MSTS Forever! A good friend, Cdr USN Ret., did his time in that service. I need to forward the railbound tugs images to him.

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;`+$?^?
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Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

When I visited the Army Transportation Museum at Ft. Eustus, Virginia about 35 years ago, one of these 45' tugs was plinthed along with some cool railroad equipment. Photo is attached.

For more about the museum, see https://transportation.army.mil/museum/index.html . There are few paragraphs about the Army's "Navy" on the site, though pretty spare.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 9/2/2019 10:29 AM, Andy Laurent via Groups.Io wrote:
Gents,

I found an interesting image of two US Army tugboats on 3 flatcars on the Wisconsin Maritime Museum's web archive. This is on the Ahnapee & Western Railway in Sturgeon Bay, WI in 1943. Hulls on the end cars, pilot houses on the center car.  I would assume that the openings in the deck would have been covered with canvas.  Could be a nice project for those little Sylvan tug kits.

https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/photo/AC9F4214-546F-46BF-B409-355078807411 

from the collection: https://wisconsinmaritime.pastperfectonline.com/vocabulary 

Cheers,
Andy L
Wisconsin

Bob Webber
 

Higgins built ships for the Army in (or just outside of) New Orleans - they were large, ocean going vessels for supply. In addition, the Army had all sorts of small craft, they were the agent of control for large passenger ships, etc. At one point, the Army controlled more ships than many, many navies. This is not unlike their air component - after the USAF was created, the Army still controlled many small & cargo planes. I wonder how many people remember "The Wackiest Ship In The Army" (not the same thing, but the name is in line)

BTW - the steel for one of Higgins creations was brought from Bessemer over night (due to perceived need) - on the rear of a ....SOU passenger train.

Higgins started his boat business providing boats for oil rigs, swamp logging, and other festivities - and most of his creations, up to the Army ships & the C-46s - were delivered by STMFC to Virginia, and points west.

At 05:37 PM 9/2/2019, Bill Welch wrote:
I did know the Army had its own Navy.

Bill Welch
Bob Webber

Edward
 

And, the US Army's 'navy' included several ferryboats in NY Harbor, to serve the First Army base on Governor's Island.
At one time, Governor's Island also had a railroad of sorts, operated by the US Army and served by car float from Brooklyn.
It was phased out after WW I.

Ed B

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Sep 3, 2019, at 07:34, Bob Webber <rgz17@...> wrote:

Higgins built ships for the Army in (or just outside of) New Orleans
Thank you; I’d forgotten. What I still remember is that San Francisco’s Fort Mason was the Army’s port of embarkation for the Pacific, and State Belt rails brought freight in from WP and Santa Fe car floats and from an interchange with the SP at King Street along East Street (AKA The Embarcadero) and through a tunnel under Black Point to Fort Mason and the Presidio. See Bill Kaufman’s _The State Belt_, Signature Press, for that railroad connection.

^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!( @|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G

spsalso
 

From David H. Grover's "U. S. Army Ships and Watercraft of World War II":

In WWII, the Army had more vessels than the Navy--about twice as many (127,793).

This included a number of stern and side-wheelers.  And some sailing ships.

It's a terrific book!


Ed

Edward Sutorik

Ken Vandevoort
 

On Mon, Sep 2, 2019 at 03:37 PM, Bill Welch wrote:
I did know the Army had its own Navy.

Bill Welch
The Air Force also had its own Navy.  Don't know if they still do, but the boats were part of Air Force Communications Service back in the late 60's.

Ken Vandevoort

Jim Gates
 

A fairly decent website on the Army's small tugs: http://www.usarmysttugs.com/index.html

Jim Gates

On Tuesday, September 3, 2019, 1:29:56 PM CDT, Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:


And, the US Army's 'navy' included several ferryboats in NY Harbor, to serve the First Army base on Governor's Island.
At one time, Governor's Island also had a railroad of sorts, operated by the US Army and served by car float from Brooklyn.
It was phased out after WW I.

Ed B