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USATC WWII tank cars

Fred Jansz
 

In 1944, after the invasion in Normandy, France, the US brought a large amount of engines & cars to Europe. Among those many Whitecomb engines and a large amount of double dome tank cars. These engines and cars served in Holland after the war -while waiting for our own diesels & cars. I've bought a HO-scale kit of the whitecomb engine which served as power -sometimes doubled- for the oil can trains overhere. These trains were mainly made up of the USATC double dome tank cars, that were leased to various oil companies. European manufacturer Roco did a run of these years ago (pictures) Not being a tank car specialist, my question to you is; 'is there an American HO-scale alternative for these rather crude Roco cars'? (which are rare too).
Best regards from Holland, Fred Jansz

Dennis Storzek
 

Nothing like them in the US. They are not two compartment cars; a standard dome of adequate capacity would not fit European clearances, so two smaller domes were used. Note only one dome has a manway and safety valves. Likely the underframes have something in common with the same builder's domestic product... anyone know who built them?

Dennis Storzek

Richard Townsend
 

AC&F built at least some of them. One is shown in Kaminski's AC&F book (not the tank car book). I have one of the models. I'm planning on using Archer rivets to make the car into a two-compartment car, adding Tichy manways and safety valves, and creating a new underframe from Intermountain parts.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Sep 3, 2019 8:50 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] USATC WWII tank cars

Nothing like them in the US. They are not two compartment cars; a standard dome of adequate capacity would not fit European clearances, so two smaller domes were used. Note only one dome has a manway and safety valves. Likely the underframes have something in common with the same builder's domestic product... anyone know who built them?

Dennis Storzek