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Weathering A 1920s Tank Car


Bob Chaparro
 

On another group Larry Olsen asked:

"I’m going to be weathering a Tangent General American 8000 gallon insulated tank car. The tank car is silver and has a 1922 built date. I want to weather the car to represent a three year car that has been hauling gasoline. As prototype 1920’s color photos aren’t available, what colors should I use to weather the tank. Should I just weather the soot that would accumulate on the top of the tank and run down the sides when wet. Would light rust begin to appear on the tank top for a tank car three years old. Then add the wheel splashed on the ends and under side of the tank. Thanks for the help."

Suggestions?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bruce Smith
 

Add spilled lading on the center section of the tank where the dome is and it sounds pretty complete. I would skip most rust, although a little at the tank bands where they move on the tank during expansion and contraction might be in order. 

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Friday, December 25, 2020 6:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Weathering A 1920s Tank Car
 

On another group Larry Olsen asked:

"I’m going to be weathering a Tangent General American 8000 gallon insulated tank car. The tank car is silver and has a 1922 built date. I want to weather the car to represent a three year car that has been hauling gasoline. As prototype 1920’s color photos aren’t available, what colors should I use to weather the tank. Should I just weather the soot that would accumulate on the top of the tank and run down the sides when wet. Would light rust begin to appear on the tank top for a tank car three years old. Then add the wheel splashed on the ends and under side of the tank. Thanks for the help."

Suggestions?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Todd Sullivan
 

Except that, if the tank car is insulated, the tank bands would be installed to run under the insulation so they could securely clamp the tank to the frame.  Tank car insulation was asbestos sheet covered by a thin metal jacket, not very substantial material for the tank straps to clamp to.

Todd Sullivan.


Tony Thompson
 

Todd Sullivan wrote:

Except that, if the tank car is insulated, the tank bands would be installed to run under the insulation so they could securely clamp the tank to the frame.  Tank car insulation was asbestos sheet covered by a thin metal jacket . . .

Not ordinarily, unless hot cargoes were expected. Magnesite was more common, and fiberglass batts were used too. Lots of photos of both at AC&F.
    But Todd's point is that hold-down bands were NOT outside jackets, important to know.

Tony Thompson




Todd Sullivan
 

Thank you for the additional information, Tony.  Gifts of information like this are what makes this collection of modelers the best, in my  opinion.

Todd Sullivan