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West India Fruit & Steamship Company Historic Film

Bob Chaparro
 

West India Fruit & Steamship Company Historic Film

Railroad coverage starts about four minutes into the film. The film appears to end without full coverage of exports to the U.S.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLO0qNmSZ7s

Description: "This is a short film about the West India Fruit and Steamship Company based out of West Palm Beach, Florida. It was made as a promotional film for the company I believe in the 1950's. The company was created by my cousin, Daniel E. Taylor and his three brothers from Sea Level, NC. They went on into business and needed a way to ship their products to and from Cuba. There are several shots of Jacksonville area."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

mel perry
 

a pfe reefer to cuba at 10:45, wonder
what was being exported?
mel perry

On Sat, Dec 14, 2019, 10:06 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

West India Fruit & Steamship Company Historic Film

Railroad coverage starts about four minutes into the film. The film appears to end without full coverage of exports to the U.S.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLO0qNmSZ7s

Description: "This is a short film about the West India Fruit and Steamship Company based out of West Palm Beach, Florida. It was made as a promotional film for the company I believe in the 1950's. The company was created by my cousin, Daniel E. Taylor and his three brothers from Sea Level, NC. They went on into business and needed a way to ship their products to and from Cuba. There are several shots of Jacksonville area."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

John Barry
 

Speculation on:

Apples, cherries, and other tree fruits that need a winter frost.
Canned goods that needed insulation from heat or cold enroute.

Speculation off.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

On Sunday, December 15, 2019, 1:32:14 AM EST, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:


a pfe reefer to cuba at 10:45, wonder
what was being exported?
mel perry

On Sat, Dec 14, 2019, 10:06 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

West India Fruit & Steamship Company Historic Film

Railroad coverage starts about four minutes into the film. The film appears to end without full coverage of exports to the U.S.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLO0qNmSZ7s

Description: "This is a short film about the West India Fruit and Steamship Company based out of West Palm Beach, Florida. It was made as a promotional film for the company I believe in the 1950's. The company was created by my cousin, Daniel E. Taylor and his three brothers from Sea Level, NC. They went on into business and needed a way to ship their products to and from Cuba. There are several shots of Jacksonville area."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Bob Chaparro
 

The West India Fruit & Steamship Company had boxcars and refrigerator cars in its fleet. In addition to the traffic between the Port of Palm Beach and Havana, the company also ferried freight cars to New Orleans.

By the middle 1950s, up to eighty railroad cars each way per day were being transferred between the United States and Cuba. Inbound freight to the U.S. included tobacco, refined sugar, pineapples, rum, tomatoes, slaughterhouse byproducts, and scrap metal. Cuban bound freight included less-than-carload merchandise, manufactured goods, chemicals, lard, railway equipment, temperate zone fruit such as apples, pears, and grapes, meat, dairy, steel products, and machinery.

These cars traveled all over. Here are photos of boxcars WIF 321 and WIF 106 in Vancouver, British Columbia:

http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/uploads/r/null/9/2/927338/7658ec35-f30a-4588-a7a3-ceb33329747c-A28964.jpg

http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/uploads/r/null/9/2/927329/41b0bb2a-a9bf-4ce9-85ad-d213a848aedb-A28963.jpg

And more research determined their freight cars did indeed travel to Southern California. I even found a photograph of one of their cars in Los Angeles at a Southern Pacific yard:

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20988463

The boxcar (WIF 233) is just behind the two tank cars. Also notice the Canadian Pacific eight-hatch meat reefer (CP 283285) to the right.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Bob Webber
 

They got as far as West Oakland....


At 11:14 AM 12/15/2019, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

The West India Fruit & Steamship Company had boxcars and refrigerator cars in its fleet. In addition to the traffic between the Port of Palm Beach and Havana, the company also ferried freight cars to New Orleans.

By the middle 1950s, up to eighty railroad cars each way per day were being transferred between the United States and Cuba. Inbound freight to the U.S. included tobacco, refined sugar, pineapples, rum, tomatoes, slaughterhouse byproducts, and scrap metal. Cuban bound freight included less-than-carload merchandise, manufactured goods, chemicals, lard, railway equipment, temperate zone fruit such as apples, pears, and grapes, meat, dairy, steel products, and machinery.

These cars traveled all over. Here are photos of boxcars WIF 321 and WIF 106 in Vancouver, British Columbia:

http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/uploads/r/null/9/2/927338/7658ec35-f30a-4588-a7a3-ceb33329747c-A28964.jpg

http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/uploads/r/null/9/2/927329/41b0bb2a-a9bf-4ce9-85ad-d213a848aedb-A28963.jpg

And more research determined their freight cars did indeed travel to Southern California. I even found a photograph of one of their cars in Los Angeles at a Southern Pacific yard:

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20988463

The boxcar (WIF 233) is just behind the two tank cars. Also notice the Canadian Pacific eight-hatch meat reefer (CP 283285) to the right.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Bob Webber

Richard Townsend
 

Is there any evidence of Cuban cars coming to the US, or was all the traffic in US cars?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Dec 15, 2019 9:15 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] West India Fruit & Steamship Company Historic Film

The West India Fruit & Steamship Company had boxcars and refrigerator cars in its fleet. In addition to the traffic between the Port of Palm Beach and Havana, the company also ferried freight cars to New Orleans.
By the middle 1950s, up to eighty railroad cars each way per day were being transferred between the United States and Cuba. Inbound freight to the U.S. included tobacco, refined sugar, pineapples, rum, tomatoes, slaughterhouse byproducts, and scrap metal. Cuban bound freight included less-than-carload merchandise, manufactured goods, chemicals, lard, railway equipment, temperate zone fruit such as apples, pears, and grapes, meat, dairy, steel products, and machinery.
These cars traveled all over. Here are photos of boxcars WIF 321 and WIF 106 in Vancouver, British Columbia:
And more research determined their freight cars did indeed travel to Southern California. I even found a photograph of one of their cars in Los Angeles at a Southern Pacific yard:
The boxcar (WIF 233) is just behind the two tank cars. Also notice the Canadian Pacific eight-hatch meat reefer (CP 283285) to the right.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Edward
 

The rail traffic to Cuba, as with Mexico, was mainly in US owned cars.
However new cars built in the US for the Consolidated Railways of Cuba, National of Mexico or other foreign railroads using the AAR coupler, standard gauge and Westinghouse air brake, had their equipment roll on US rails from the factory to a shipping point.
All of them were painted and usually lettered, wearing Metric dimensional and weight data. For US operation, English Empire data would also be required (feet, inches, pounds and tons).
Note that Canadian freight cars carry both, as well as lettering in English and French.  
So modeling a brand new car for NdeM or Cuba Consolidated and running it on a US theme model railroad would be a stretch but not incorrect.
Mainly because there would be more than one car of them in a train for delivery at the border, or a port for shipment abroad. 

Ed Bommer

Donald B. Valentine
 

    Well Bob I had hoped that the second car photo you posted might have saved the day as it appears
 to be an earlier lettering style that I, at least, have not ever seen before. Unfortunately a check of my
1946 and 1947 ORER's draws a total blank. So I gather that this entire operation did not get under way 
until 1949 or the very early 1950's which is beyond my Dec. 1948 cut-off date. The film is none-the-less 
of interest for the ship photos. I gather that these ships were strictly for below deck loading, much like the
Great Lakes car ferries on which I enjoyed a trip back in 1978, but that these were rear loading only with
four tracks. The tie down equipment is very interesting but what were all the structures on top of the ferry
deck? It appears that like many of the earlier freight lines that these car ferries also may have carried
passengers. The Proto-2000 LV auto boxcar being unloaded was of particular interest as was the flat car
of new Corn Binder, read that as International Harvester, tractors which I suspect several other readers
caught as well as you PFE reefer.

Thanks very much for posting this, Don Valentine

Walter Cox
 



In a message dated 12/15/2019 3:31:41 PM Eastern Standard Time, edb8381@... writes:

<Note that Canadian freight cars carry both, as well as lettering in English and French.> 
The addition of metric and French did not occur on CN until after the period of this list and I think that is true for CP as well.
Walt. ( Modelling CN in 1959.)

Guy Wilber
 


Ed wrote:

"The rail traffic to Cuba, as with Mexico, was mainly in US owned cars.
However new cars built in the US for the Consolidated Railways of Cuba, National of Mexico or other foreign railroads using the AAR coupler, standard gauge and Westinghouse air brake, had their equipment roll on US rails from the factory to a shipping point."
All of them were painted and usually lettered, wearing Metric dimensional and weight data. For US operation, English Empire data would also be required (feet, inches, pounds and tons).
Note that Canadian freight cars carry both, as well as lettering in English and French.  
So modeling a brand new car for NdeM or Cuba Consolidated and running it on a US theme model railroad would be a stretch but not incorrect.
Mainly because there would be more than one car of them in a train for delivery at the border, or a port for shipment abroad."

You are correct regarding the Cuban Railroads, but incorrect about Mexican roads.  The various Mexican roads interchanged cars with several US roads which served the Southwest.  Any ORER will list the interchange points.  

A good number of Mexican railroads were members of The MCBA, The ARA and AAR and adhered to the Interchange Rules.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



 


_._,_._,_

Bob Chaparro
 

Ships -

Don, you may find some of the ships on-line.

Before West India Fruit and Steamship Company, Seatrain Lines (the operating name for the Over-Seas Shipping Company) shipping by using entire loaded rail cars between ports in the United States and Havana, Cuba, with the first shipment in December 1928 aboard a specially designed ship, Seatrain. This original ship, later renamed Seatrain New Orleans, was capable of carrying 95 fully loaded rail cars.

The company built two larger specialized ships in 1932, Seatrain New York and Seatrain Havana with greater rail car capacity. In 1939 two more ships were added, Seatrain Texas and Seatrain New Jersey.

The original 1928 shipment aboard Seatrain caused a labor issue that foretold similar issues later with container ships when Cuban stevedores demanded that they not only unload the rail cars from the ship but unload and repack the rail car contents before turning the cars over to Cuban railways.

In 1951 Seatrain Lines added two additional railcar carriers, the Seatrain Georgia and Seatrain Louisiana. That year Seatrain also ceased operations to and from Cuba, and renamed its ship Seatrain Havana to Seatrain Savannah to reflect the suspension of service. In 1953 Seatrain sold its operating authority to trade between the US and Cuba to the West India Fruit and Steamship Company, along with its first ship, the Seatrain New Orleans, which was renamed Sea Level. West India Fruit & Steamship Company already had been in operation from 1946.

mel perry
 

well that explsins all.the double handling
shown in the.video, problem still.exsists
today on the west coast, that's the main
reason, why tbe port of portland.no
longer exists, with everything.being
trucked to the ports in seattle or tacoma,
cut off the nose to spite the face
mel perry

On Sun, Dec 15, 2019, 5:08 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Ships -

Don, you may find some of the ships on-line.

Before West India Fruit and Steamship Company, Seatrain Lines (the operating name for the Over-Seas Shipping Company) shipping by using entire loaded rail cars between ports in the United States and Havana, Cuba, with the first shipment in December 1928 aboard a specially designed ship, Seatrain. This original ship, later renamed Seatrain New Orleans, was capable of carrying 95 fully loaded rail cars.

The company built two larger specialized ships in 1932, Seatrain New York and Seatrain Havana with greater rail car capacity. In 1939 two more ships were added, Seatrain Texas and Seatrain New Jersey.

The original 1928 shipment aboard Seatrain caused a labor issue that foretold similar issues later with container ships when Cuban stevedores demanded that they not only unload the rail cars from the ship but unload and repack the rail car contents before turning the cars over to Cuban railways.

In 1951 Seatrain Lines added two additional railcar carriers, the Seatrain Georgia and Seatrain Louisiana. That year Seatrain also ceased operations to and from Cuba, and renamed its ship Seatrain Havana to Seatrain Savannah to reflect the suspension of service. In 1953 Seatrain sold its operating authority to trade between the US and Cuba to the West India Fruit and Steamship Company, along with its first ship, the Seatrain New Orleans, which was renamed Sea Level. West India Fruit & Steamship Company already had been in operation from 1946.