Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench


Charlie Duckworth
 

Just finished this last night, was a delightful build.  I wanted a faded brown and used TruColor MKT Brown mixed with ART yellow.   NSC decals used.  

Charlie Duckworth


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Paul Doggett
 

Charlie 

Nice work as always.

Paul Doggett 


On 6 May 2022, at 11:47, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:


Just finished this last night, was a delightful build.  I wanted a faded brown and used TruColor MKT Brown mixed with ART yellow.   NSC decals used.  

Charlie Duckworth
IMG_2583.jpgIMG_2582.jpgIMG_2581.jpg

--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


O Fenton Wells
 

Nice looking car Charlie, good finish
Fenton

On Fri, May 6, 2022 at 6:47 AM Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:
Just finished this last night, was a delightful build.  I wanted a faded brown and used TruColor MKT Brown mixed with ART yellow.   NSC decals used.  

Charlie Duckworth


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Charlie Duckworth
 

Thanks, a quick search on this group disclosed the star was used by the NYC to signify the car was for grain loading.  I’ve got three feed mills and three elevators so it fits in very well. 

On Fri, May 6, 2022 at 6:12 AM O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:
Nice looking car Charlie, good finish
Fenton

On Fri, May 6, 2022 at 6:47 AM Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:
Just finished this last night, was a delightful build.  I wanted a faded brown and used TruColor MKT Brown mixed with ART yellow.   NSC decals used.  

Charlie Duckworth


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



--


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Tony Thompson
 

Good looking model, Charlie. Tony


gtws00
 

Nicely done as usual.
Thanks for sharing
George Toman


Mansell Peter Hambly
 

Simply amazing!!

 

Mansell Peter Hambly

COQUITLAM, B.C.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: gtws00 via groups.io
Sent: May 6, 2022 8:30 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

 

Nicely done as usual.
Thanks for sharing
George Toman

 


Charlie Duckworth
 

Thanks for the remarks; I got this kit on the afternoon of May 2nd and finished it last night (almost a Clark build).  

Mrs D is out of town so had no interruptions 😈.   
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Jared Harper
 

SQ Junior


al_brown03
 

Nice car!

AL B.


Ken Adams
 

Really nice.

Again I like the body FCR which appears a more "rusty" color.  As I am confined to acrylics I'll have to do some research to match. I need to differentiate foreign road cars from the darker SP FCR that I have been using. 

Here it has taken me at least 3 weeks since I started an Tichy P&LE rebuild kit and I am at a point where I might assemble the body. 72 grabiron holes drilled taking at least 15 #78 drill bits. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Eric Hansmann
 

Ken,

You should invest in a motorized drill for small bits. I haven’t broken a bit for three or four years. I use a Holland can motor outfitted with a small chuck. I use a 9v battery for power. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On May 6, 2022, at 4:33 PM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

Really nice.

Again I like the body FCR which appears a more "rusty" color.  As I am confined to acrylics I'll have to do some research to match. I need to differentiate foreign road cars from the darker SP FCR that I have been using. 

Here it has taken me at least 3 weeks since I started an Tichy P&LE rebuild kit and I am at a point where I might assemble the body. 72 grabiron holes drilled taking at least 15 #78 drill bits. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Tim O'Connor
 

Ken

Hahahaha!! Sometime about 30 years ago I realized that if I bought a good drill press it would
eventually pay for itself in tiny drill bits !! It's been pretty rare now for years for me to break a drill
bit - and it only happens when I am doing the work by hand.

With a good drill press you could use #80 drills or even smaller ones. I keep a #80 in the press and
if I need a larger hole or two, I just use tiny reamers to enlarge the holes. :-D

Tim O'Connor



On 5/6/2022 5:33 PM, Ken Adams wrote:
Really nice.

Again I like the body FCR which appears a more "rusty" color.  As I am confined to acrylics I'll have to do some research to match. I need to differentiate foreign road cars from the darker SP FCR that I have been using. 

Here it has taken me at least 3 weeks since I started an Tichy P&LE rebuild kit and I am at a point where I might assemble the body. 72 grabiron holes drilled taking at least 15 #78 drill bits. 
--
Ken Adams

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Charlie Duckworth
 

I was going to recommend that as well, I’ve got an handheld that takes 3 AAA batteries and my ratio of broken bits dropped significantly 

On Fri, May 6, 2022 at 4:37 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:
Ken,

You should invest in a motorized drill for small bits. I haven’t broken a bit for three or four years. I use a Holland can motor outfitted with a small chuck. I use a 9v battery for power. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On May 6, 2022, at 4:33 PM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

Really nice.

Again I like the body FCR which appears a more "rusty" color.  As I am confined to acrylics I'll have to do some research to match. I need to differentiate foreign road cars from the darker SP FCR that I have been using. 

Here it has taken me at least 3 weeks since I started an Tichy P&LE rebuild kit and I am at a point where I might assemble the body. 72 grabiron holes drilled taking at least 15 #78 drill bits. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


D. Scott Chatfield
 

Ken Adams wrote:

> "72 grabiron holes taking at least 15 #78 drill bits."

You are either chucking the bits wrong or drinking too much scotch.*

The proper way to chuck a small diameter bit is with twice the length of the flutes sticking out of the chuck.

For example, the #78 bits I use (whatever my LHS sells in bulk) have flutes that are .20" long, so .40" sticks out.

You know how I most often break a small bit?  By dropping the pin vise.


Scott Chatfield

* Chatfield's Fourth Law:  "If you drink scotch, you're an alcoholic."


Scott H. Haycock
 

I've been following this thread and I agree in principle with Scott Chatfield about the length of exposed bit in a pin vise.  I expose the bit the thickness of the material I'm drilling through, plus 1/16'' or so so I don't damage the body with the nose of the chuck when the bit clears. I also use beeswax as a lubricant.

I think a main reason for bit breakage is that many modelers hold the shell (or whatever) to rigidly. It takes a light hand and patience!

The attachments show a fixture I built to aid me in my modelmaking endeavors. Because it holds the body shell flexibly and securely, It works great for drilling and detailing body shells.

The first photo shows the materials I used- 2 blocks of 3/4'' MDF, one of those foam kit inserts from Accurail, intermountain, etc., and some wood glue.

The rest of the photos should be self explanatory. The weight of the fixture precludes the necessity of clamps, but I have some spring clamps that I can use if needed.


  

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 05/06/2022 11:09 PM D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:


Ken Adams wrote:

> "72 grabiron holes taking at least 15 #78 drill bits."

You are either chucking the bits wrong or drinking too much scotch.*

The proper way to chuck a small diameter bit is with twice the length of the flutes sticking out of the chuck.

For example, the #78 bits I use (whatever my LHS sells in bulk) have flutes that are .20" long, so .40" sticks out.

You know how I most often break a small bit?  By dropping the pin vise.


Scott Chatfield

* Chatfield's Fourth Law:  "If you drink scotch, you're an alcoholic."


Nelson Moyer
 

Both Jack Burgess and I have written about pin vises and drilling technique in detail, so check the resincarbuilder archives using the search entry ‘pinvise’. There may also be information in the plasticfreight car builder, proto-layouts, and this group.

 

While the pinvise you choose matters, your technique, or lack thereof, is the primary cause of broken bits.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott H. Haycock
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 2:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

 

I've been following this thread and I agree in principle with Scott Chatfield about the length of exposed bit in a pin vise.  I expose the bit the thickness of the material I'm drilling through, plus 1/16'' or so so I don't damage the body with the nose of the chuck when the bit clears. I also use beeswax as a lubricant.

 

I think a main reason for bit breakage is that many modelers hold the shell (or whatever) to rigidly. It takes a light hand and patience!

 

The attachments show a fixture I built to aid me in my modelmaking endeavors. Because it holds the body shell flexibly and securely, It works great for drilling and detailing body shells.

 

The first photo shows the materials I used- 2 blocks of 3/4'' MDF, one of those foam kit inserts from Accurail, intermountain, etc., and some wood glue.

 

The rest of the photos should be self explanatory. The weight of the fixture precludes the necessity of clamps, but I have some spring clamps that I can use if needed.

 

 

  

Scott Haycock

 


Nelson Moyer
 

I just searched resincarbuilders under pinvise and got nothing. I tried pin vise. and got all the posts related to the topic.


Brad Andonian
 

Love the model!


I keep a spoon of olive oil for lubing.    Have also used Ed-40.


Ken Adams
 

Thanks for all the comments about my grab iron hole drilling. My tools  and drilling setup are shown below.

My only explanation is that I might have gotten a bad batch of Gyros #78 drill bits.  I have never had such bad results as this before. I have been drilling grab iron holes since the 1980's. 
They last 4 were drilled with a #76 bit which did not break after 10/12 twists.  Note that I am using a Mascot twist drill with non rotating wood handle. Boelube (from Boeing development) was used on every new bit and when cleared. The holes and bits were cleared of plastic regularly as I drilled.  I have not had problems with Gyros bits before and found them to last often beyond one project.  I am now done with the 72 holes. The grab irons have been inserted and secured with Plasti-Zap Medium CA from behind. I will probably let primer and paint coats fill the gaps in the grab iron holes. 

 The next challenge is cutting the bolt heads off 72 Grandt Line 3/4 nut to glue above the grab irons.  Unfortunately my pipette glue applicator is clogged. Soaking in IPA now.

And I usually drink Irish whiskey not Scotch (unless I happen on an excellent single malt at an affordable price.)

My plan for the future is only build kits of more modern cars that have ladders not grab irons for reaching the car roof. 


--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2xx may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io