Westinghouse "K"-Series Brake System


Charles Greene
 

This concerns an admittedly minute detail of the system, yet I'd still like to model it in HO. It's the control rod for the variable release valve on the air reservoir. Although the length varied depending on individual installation requirements dictated by the car design, I would think the diameter would probably have been the same in most cases. I haven't found a diagram that shows it in the car builders dictionaries or Westinhouse Co. pubs. 

Anybody know what the diameter is or what pub(s) might show it? Looking at photos of cars where I can see the rod, I'm guessing it's maybe 3/8 in. to 1/2 in.

        -Chuck Greene


Dave Parker
 

Chuck:

I've looked in those same sources and never seen it, and I wonder if the diameter of those rods was even standardized.

I have modeled them on a couple of cars, and used an eyeball approach.  In this GLa photo, we know the retainer line is 0.675" d (3/8" standard pipe), the grabs are usually right around 3/4", so I think 3/8" for the release rod would be about the upper end here.  That would be 0.0043" wire in HO, not a "standard" size in the Tichy line for example.  But, wire that fine can be found in my fly-tying world, and I suspect in the craft/jewelry space as well.

Hope this helps.



--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I usually use .010 for thus feature.  Although it is unlikely to be touched in handling this saves me from using .008 or .006 and having you straighten it later.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Charles Greene <greenec1144@...>
Date: 5/3/22 11:37 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Westinghouse "K"-Series Brake System

This concerns an admittedly minute detail of the system, yet I'd still like to model it in HO. It's the control rod for the variable release valve on the air reservoir. Although the length varied depending on individual installation requirements dictated by the car design, I would think the diameter would probably have been the same in most cases. I haven't found a diagram that shows it in the car builders dictionaries or Westinhouse Co. pubs. 

Anybody know what the diameter is or what pub(s) might show it? Looking at photos of cars where I can see the rod, I'm guessing it's maybe 3/8 in. to 1/2 in.

        -Chuck Greene


Nelson Moyer
 

I use 0.010 in. wire. The handles have a tendency to get snagged and bent as Bill says. I also use 0.012 in. or 0.0125 in. wire for grab irons when I have to bend replacements because that’s the size included in kits. Yes, 0.010 or 0.008 in. look better, but I’m not into bending more grab irons than absolutely necessary, as the majority of my cars have grab ladders.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Tuesday, May 3, 2022 9:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Westinghouse "K"-Series Brake System

 

I usually use .010 for thus feature.  Although it is unlikely to be touched in handling this saves me from using .008 or .006 and having you straighten it later.

 

Bill Pardie

 


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Tue, May 3, 2022 at 04:48 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
I've looked in those same sources and never seen it, and I wonder if the diameter of those rods was even standardized.
They were.



From the 1922 CBC. The D handle wasn't common, note the drawing says "Any other form of handle may be used," normally a downward bend and about 5" of handle was found to be sufficient. .005 wire is available, and phosphor bronze or stainless steel would hold up better than brass.

Dennis Storzek


Charles Greene
 

Ok....thanks everyone for your input. Lacking a published standard, I think I'll also just go with the eyeball approach. I've got some .006 in. wire that would get me to a hair over half an inch. True, as you say Dave, .0043 in. would nail the 3/8 in. estimate, but at age 79 I don't know if I could even see it....ha!

        -Chuck Greene


Charles Greene
 

Whoops! I missed seeing your note, Dennis. So there is apparently some reference to it in the '22 CBD. I'll take a look.

        -Chuck Greene


Dave Parker
 

Dennis, can you please send a page or figure number?  Whatever you tried to paste into your message is not coming through, either in may email, or in the groups.io Messages folder.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Nelson Moyer  wrote:

I use 0.010 in. wire. The handles have a tendency to get snagged and bent as Bill says.

Exactly why I no longer install these on cars for my operating layout.

Tony Thompson




Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Wed, May 4, 2022 at 11:15 AM, Dave Parker wrote:
Dennis, can you please send a page or figure number?  Whatever you tried to paste into your message is not coming through, either in may email, or in the groups.io Messages folder.
That's odd. it shows up fine for me, but it's in a drawing of standard brake rods and levers on page 770.

Dennis Storzek


Charles Greene
 

Dennis,

Although I've decided on the wire gauge I'll use for the control rod I would still be interested in seeing the reference in the '22 CBC you cited. I've looked on the web for that edition, but have only found copies for sale. Is it available for public view on some website? If so, where? 

Thanks,
  Chuck Greene


Dave Parker
 

The 1922 CBC is still purchase-only as far as I know.  But the 1919 is in Google Books, and the 1925 recently appeared at Hathi Trust.

The figure that Dennis referred to was part of the MCB/ARA brake gear standard and appears in both edition -- p. 1036 in the 1919 edition, p. 902 in the 1925.

It's also Plate 18 of the 1918 MCB Stds and RPs which can be found via Google.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Thu, May 5, 2022 at 01:04 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
The 1922 CBC is still purchase-only as far as I know.
The 1922 CBC was offered on CD about twenty years ago by an outfit called Rail Driver, IIRC. It had all the pages as HTML files and the illustrations as JPG's, and a relatively good front end. It also included a utility to re-size the drawings and print them to a known scale, which I never used because I typically pick up measurements off drawings with a digital calipers, using a given dimension to set a 'local' scale and poking the conversion factor into my calculator... all this protected by a copyright notice, of course. However, since the '22 CBC is now in the public domain, and are therefore not able to be copyrighted, I've always treated the actual scanned images as if I had purchased a collection of clipart. I have no idea why this simple JPG file did not make the trip to the list; others have before. I'll try again.



Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

Darned, wrong file. Let's try this again.


Charles Greene
 

Ok...thanks, Dennis (for the '22 extract) and Dave (for the reference to the '19 CBC). Yeah, the downward bend/right angle handle seems to be more prominent than the "D"shape, at least in photos I've seen. 

       -Chuck Greene