Topics

Wine car ops


Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Not entirely useless. Chateau Martin owned at least one Pfaudler steel 40'
car, which I shot in Pine Bluff, AK. #CMWX 1008

Sadly, the date falls outside the range of this discussion group (Jan 75).
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Brian Ehni

If we can get injection-molded styrene
"conversation pieces" like Pfaudler milk reefers, which are entirely
useless to modelers of southern, southwestern, and western RRs, why not
six compartment wine tank cars?

Richard Hendrickson


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 21, 2005, at 4:50 PM, PBowers wrote:

While the wine car might be an interesting conversation piece, I would
expect it was operated over few routes. Unless your modelled railway has a
winery or bottling facility, or is on the route in between is it a logical
car to have? For interst sake, how many routes would these cars be found on?
It's true that glass-lined wine tank cars were not numerous. However, there were single, three, and four compartment wine tank cars as well as six compartment cars, and the total of all types added up to hundreds of cars. General American, Shippers Car Line, and North American all owned them and leased them to a variety of wine shippers. In addition to a sizable number of California vintners, lessees of wine tank cars included, for example, Ambrose of Kansas City; Pirrone & Sons of Garfield, NJ; and K. Arekelian of Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York, who shipped wine east in bulk for local bottling. Taylor and other upstate New York wine producers had California wines shipped east (in unmarked cars) to be blended with the local product because the growing season was too short there to bring up the sugar to desirable levels, and I've been told (though I've seen no direct evidence) that the same practice was followed by wineries in Virginia and other eastern states as well.

Wine tank cars would certainly not have been seen on branch lines in places like Kansas or Georgia. But there is abundant photographic evidence of them in the trains of the major transcontinental carriers that served California such as the Santa Fe, Union Pacific/C&NW, and Southern Pacific/Rock Island/T&NO/SSW, sometimes several of them at one time, en route to widely scattered destinations. Indeed, in some parts of California wine tank cars, like helium tank cars, were more commonly seen than coal hoppers, and much more commonly than milk reefers (which were, in fact, non-existent in the far west), difficult as that may be for easterners to imagine. If we can get injection-molded styrene "conversation pieces" like Pfaudler milk reefers, which are entirely useless to modelers of southern, southwestern, and western RRs, why not six compartment wine tank cars?

Richard Hendrickson


Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

The wine cars may have had few origination points but many termination points.

On Sep 21, 2005, at 7:50 PM, PBowers wrote:

While the wine car might be an interesting conversation piece, I would
expect it was operated over few routes. Unless your modelled railway has a
winery or bottling facility, or is on the route in between is it a logical
car to have? For interst sake, how many routes would these cars be found on?

(Why do I whine about wine cars?? Whine not??)

Peter Bowers


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PBowers <waiting@...>
 

While the wine car might be an interesting conversation piece, I would expect it was operated over few routes. Unless your modelled railway has a winery or bottling facility, or is on the route in between is it a logical car to have? For interst sake, how many routes would these cars be found on?

(Why do I whine about wine cars?? Whine not??)

Peter Bowers


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raildata@...
 

I recall seeing multiple compartment wine car in Pennsylvania during the
1940s. Don't recall reporting marks, etc. but the stuff was rebottled as "Virgina
Dare" by the Brrokside distilling Co.

Chuck Y
Boulder CO


Andreas K├╝hnpast <Andreas.Kuehnpast@...>
 

raildata@aol.com wrote:

I recall seeing multiple compartment wine car in Pennsylvania during the
1940s. Don't recall reporting marks, etc. but the stuff was rebottled as "Virgina
Dare" by the Brrokside distilling Co.

Chuck Y
Boulder CO
I have found out that a former customer of "my shortline", Vermont's Barre & Chelsea,
was also involved in a similar kind of activity: Calmont Beverage Co. in Barre, VT
started importing wine from California in 1941 and bottled it in Vermont. They
obviously were the first company to do so in Vermont.

The company website (www.calmontbeverage.com/index.htm) states: "... came up with the
idea to bring barreled wine to Vermont, via rail, and bottle it here under the
Calmont brand name (a contraction of California/Vermont)." Would wine have been sent
in barrels in reefers or would it have been transported in tank cars?

In the "Barre & Chelsea Industrial Guide" issued in August 1953 Calmont Beverage is
listed as having a B&C spur track and the main commodity received was "malt
beverages" (i.e. beer). Could this be an indication that (bulk) wine transport had
stopped by that date? Or was it just an indication of more important beer traffic?

In the past we had been discussing grape shipments to Barre, VT for DIY wine making.
When would these shipments have ended, when the bulk shipment of wine to Vermont
started in 1941? Or did wine (and grappa!) making in Vermont communities with a high
percentage of Italians (like South Ryegate) continue after that date?

Getting thirsty from this topic...

Andreas Kuehnpast